A Sharp Group

| June 29, 2001

Like all trucking companies, the Sharps face the challenges of keeping drivers, and rising fuel and insurance costs. Another challenge of Sharp Transport is keeping a balance of trucks in areas where they’re needed.

Although John has been devoted to making his business a success, trucking was not his first love. At age 12, his father died, and he began running the family farm in Ethridge. He’s partially retired from Sharp Transport, but he keeps an office in Ethridge where he is often seen. John is still a farmer at heart, and his crops include wheat, soybeans and corn.
“I’ve never missed a crop,” he says.

The Sharp family
John’s twin daughters work for him. Allie has worked at Sharp for 16 years, and Angie has seven years experience with the company. Another daughter, Ginger Sharp, worked for the company, but she decided to leave for a more corporate atmosphere. John’s wife, Becky, started the business with him and worked in the company as a bookkeeper until six years ago.
John supervises a management team that is comprised of Griffith, Allie, Angie, and Lynn Johnson, Ethridge operation manger; Larry Kirk, shop foreman; Gina Old, accountant; and Wil Hudson, intermodal director. Thinking ahead, John developed the team, hoping it would run the business one day. He thinks that this will help employees understand why it’s important to run the company efficiently.

“If they’re not involved, they don’t understand,” Allie says. “The people on the team see how decisions affect the bottom line. We want them all to feel like part of the family. The family atmosphere is important.”

Some families find it difficult to work together, but the Sharps don’t. Griffith says the daughters are dedicated to the business and make good decisions, and, like their father, they put the employees first.

“I think the way they were brought up makes them easy to work with,” Griffith says. “They’re helpful. They realized they weren’t going to gain respect from what their father has done but from what they do.”

Angie says working with her father has been a rewarding experience because it allows her to spend time with her three sons and have a career. “You can’t have that at all businesses,” she says. “Some women have to let go of some of the responsibilities of motherhood to have a career.”

“It was hard in the beginning because we had to prove to people that we weren’t taking advantage of being the daughter,” Allie says. “It’s rewarding. The future of the company is important, and we want to see it be successful because the family name is attached to it.”

John has enjoyed working with his daughters because there is a “built-in” loyalty that sometimes takes years to achieve with other employees. “At least I know this is true about my daughters, but I don’t know anything about sons,” he laughs. “Being the type person I am, it’s easier to correct my children than other employees. It’s been good working with my family.”

Longevity is evident at Sharp where 25 drivers and 20 nondriving employees have worked more than seven years with the company. Employees like Keith Slater, the Lewisburg terminal manager, strive to do the best they can for a man who leads by example.

Before becoming a dispatcher, Steve Denny spent three years driving long-haul for Sharp Transport. He says it’s a good company to work for because management promotes from within, and the family isn’t afraid to challenge its employees.

“It’s a high-stress job,” he says. “I wanted a challenge, and I got one. There is no easy job in trucking, though. All jobs are equally stressful.”

A Sharp Group

| June 29, 2001

Like all trucking companies, the Sharps face the challenges of keeping drivers, and rising fuel and insurance costs. Another challenge of Sharp Transport is keeping a balance of trucks in areas where they’re needed.

Although John has been devoted to making his business a success, trucking was not his first love. At age 12, his father died, and he began running the family farm in Ethridge. He’s partially retired from Sharp Transport, but he keeps an office in Ethridge where he is often seen. John is still a farmer at heart, and his crops include wheat, soybeans and corn.
“I’ve never missed a crop,” he says.

The Sharp family
John’s twin daughters work for him. Allie has worked at Sharp for 16 years, and Angie has seven years experience with the company. Another daughter, Ginger Sharp, worked for the company, but she decided to leave for a more corporate atmosphere. John’s wife, Becky, started the business with him and worked in the company as a bookkeeper until six years ago.
John supervises a management team that is comprised of Griffith, Allie, Angie, and Lynn Johnson, Ethridge operation manger; Larry Kirk, shop foreman; Gina Old, accountant; and Wil Hudson, intermodal director. Thinking ahead, John developed the team, hoping it would run the business one day. He thinks that this will help employees understand why it’s important to run the company efficiently.

“If they’re not involved, they don’t understand,” Allie says. “The people on the team see how decisions affect the bottom line. We want them all to feel like part of the family. The family atmosphere is important.”

Some families find it difficult to work together, but the Sharps don’t. Griffith says the daughters are dedicated to the business and make good decisions, and, like their father, they put the employees first.

“I think the way they were brought up makes them easy to work with,” Griffith says. “They’re helpful. They realized they weren’t going to gain respect from what their father has done but from what they do.”

Angie says working with her father has been a rewarding experience because it allows her to spend time with her three sons and have a career. “You can’t have that at all businesses,” she says. “Some women have to let go of some of the responsibilities of motherhood to have a career.”

“It was hard in the beginning because we had to prove to people that we weren’t taking advantage of being the daughter,” Allie says. “It’s rewarding. The future of the company is important, and we want to see it be successful because the family name is attached to it.”

John has enjoyed working with his daughters because there is a “built-in” loyalty that sometimes takes years to achieve with other employees. “At least I know this is true about my daughters, but I don’t know anything about sons,” he laughs. “Being the type person I am, it’s easier to correct my children than other employees. It’s been good working with my family.”

Longevity is evident at Sharp where 25 drivers and 20 nondriving employees have worked more than seven years with the company. Employees like Keith Slater, the Lewisburg terminal manager, strive to do the best they can for a man who leads by example.

Before becoming a dispatcher, Steve Denny spent three years driving long-haul for Sharp Transport. He says it’s a good company to work for because management promotes from within, and the family isn’t afraid to challenge its employees.

“It’s a high-stress job,” he says. “I wanted a challenge, and I got one. There is no easy job in trucking, though. All jobs are equally stressful.”

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