An Oldie but Goodie

| September 11, 2005

“There were good times and bad, but besides my kids, being a lady trucker was the best thing that ever happened to me,” she says.

Born and raised in Philadelphia, Cecchini recounts her struggle through childhood as she discovered her father’s murdered body and was abused by her mother’s many boyfriends.

To escape her rough childhood, Cecchini joined the U.S. Army, where she served in Vietnam as a medical specialist. She then experienced more death and turmoil as she witnessed a killing spree at her base.

After this torrid introduction, Cecchini focuses the book on her life as a woman trucker. At the age of 42, after raising five children, she hit the road and found true freedom through driving 18-wheelers across the country. The book describes the characters she met and her challenge to maintain her femininity in a male-dominated industry. As a symbol of her femininity, she always kept a pair of red stilettos in her truck cab, just in case she got the chance to go out dancing.

Life as a trucker was not easy for her; she survived a rape and the tough life of this occupation. Yet Cecchini believes that driving a truck was one of the few great times of her life.

After eight years as a driver, she experienced a back injury that doctors told her could be easily fixed through surgery. But the operation left her with an incurable spinal disease, adhesive arachnoiditis, which sentenced her to life in a wheelchair.

Faced with severe pain and the restricted life in a wheelchair, Cecchini’s weight ballooned to the point of endangering her health. But she forged through that battle with the help of an online support group, where she met Radford, who also has adhesive arachnoiditis. Radford is a former Associated Press correspondent in the Middle East and the author of three published thrillers. Now, after successfully undergoing a stomach-stapling operation and winning a four-year fight with workman’s comp, Cecchini lives in Rochester, Minn., and has hope for the future and for the success of her autobiography. She may never drive a truck again because of wheelchair restrictions, but she still has her red stiletto heels just in case.

High Heels & 18 Wheels: Confessions of a Lady Trucker is published by Booklocker at this site and sells for $14.95. Signed copies can be obtained directly from Bobbie Cecchini at this site.
-Christine Green


Truckers Join the Search
Think of the many faces you see each day as you drive across America. Some may be missing children.

Now truckers who want to help in the nationwide search for missing and abducted children will have a new way to participate – through Child Watch of North America’s new “Eyes of America” project.

Working with trucking associations, the project will provide truckers with posters of missing children to place on the side of their trucks. Because Child Watch receives no federal or state funding, donations and sponsorships from private individuals and companies will fund the national campaign.

Norman Schniederhan, creator of “The World’s Largest Truck Convoy,” an event benefiting the Special Olympics, will serve as the national consultant for “Eyes of America.” Schneiderhan and Janet Ritchie, director of development, developed the concept. Participants from the trucking industry include The American Trucking Associations, XM Satellite Radio, OOIDA, the State Department of Transportation, the Mid-America Trucking Show and trucking magazines.

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