Be Really Cool

| May 13, 2002

Prestone’s heavy-duty “fully-formulated” coolant meets the TMC RP-329 standard.

Extended Life coolants
Extended Life coolants use organic acid technology, sometimes combined with just a bit of nitrites and molybdates, to protect the system. Texaco (now ChevronTexaco) and Caterpillar jointly developed the concept, and Cat now recommends it as the preferred coolant. It is also marketed today under the Shell Rotella and DDC Power Cool Plus brands. After a few seal problems, this coolant is now satisfactory for use in Cummins diesels.

Fleetguard has a competitive hybrid, nitrited organic acid technology called ES Compleat. It uses a need-release type of filter and relies partly on SCAs.

The big difference with Extended Life is that there is no need to measure concentration levels as these additives are much more stable, stay active, and deplete much more slowly. You start out with pure Extended Life coolant (if changing from conventional antifreeze the system must first be properly flushed). You then either remove the cooling system filter and plumbing or replace what’s there with a filter that has no provision for adding SCAs. (Caterpillar recommends removal in order to eliminate potential maintenance concerns and the chance of installing a filter that will add SCAs.) Make sure to add ONLY Extended Life coolant in the proper proportions when there’s a leak. After 300,000 miles, add a jug of Extender. Just make sure the size of the bottle matches the capacity of your cooling system. Then, you can go another 300,000 miles.

Check your OEM manufacturer’s recommendations, because a few recommend different mileages for the addition of extender and the change.

When is it time to change?
When using standard coolant, with SCAs added manually or with maintenance filters, the change interval varies from about 150,000-240,000 miles, depending upon the OEM and whether or not you use fully-formulated antifreeze. When using need-release filters and fully-formulated coolant, the coolant change interval is 600,000 miles. With Extended Life, the interval is 300,000 to 600,000 miles, with most manufacturers accepting the longer limit.

Fully-formulated coolant with need-release filters, say both Eaton and Brisk, can last to overhaul, even if that’s 900,000 or 1,000,000 miles. Lab tests verify the safe use of the coolant to those mileages.


For more information, contact:

Amalgatech
(602) 252-0280
www.amalgatech.com

Castrol Heavy Duty Coolants
(800) 777-1466
www.castrol.com

Caterpillar Engine Div.
(309) 675-1000
www.caterpillar.com

ChevronTexaco Corp.
(415) 894-7700
www.chevrontexaco.com

CRC Industries
(800) 272-8963
www.crcindustries.com

Be Really Cool

| May 13, 2002

Prestone’s heavy-duty “fully-formulated” coolant meets the TMC RP-329 standard.

Extended Life coolants
Extended Life coolants use organic acid technology, sometimes combined with just a bit of nitrites and molybdates, to protect the system. Texaco (now ChevronTexaco) and Caterpillar jointly developed the concept, and Cat now recommends it as the preferred coolant. It is also marketed today under the Shell Rotella and DDC Power Cool Plus brands. After a few seal problems, this coolant is now satisfactory for use in Cummins diesels.

Fleetguard has a competitive hybrid, nitrited organic acid technology called ES Compleat. It uses a need-release type of filter and relies partly on SCAs.

The big difference with Extended Life is that there is no need to measure concentration levels as these additives are much more stable, stay active, and deplete much more slowly. You start out with pure Extended Life coolant (if changing from conventional antifreeze the system must first be properly flushed). You then either remove the cooling system filter and plumbing or replace what’s there with a filter that has no provision for adding SCAs. (Caterpillar recommends removal in order to eliminate potential maintenance concerns and the chance of installing a filter that will add SCAs.) Make sure to add ONLY Extended Life coolant in the proper proportions when there’s a leak. After 300,000 miles, add a jug of Extender. Just make sure the size of the bottle matches the capacity of your cooling system. Then, you can go another 300,000 miles.

Check your OEM manufacturer’s recommendations, because a few recommend different mileages for the addition of extender and the change.

When is it time to change?
When using standard coolant, with SCAs added manually or with maintenance filters, the change interval varies from about 150,000-240,000 miles, depending upon the OEM and whether or not you use fully-formulated antifreeze. When using need-release filters and fully-formulated coolant, the coolant change interval is 600,000 miles. With Extended Life, the interval is 300,000 to 600,000 miles, with most manufacturers accepting the longer limit.

Fully-formulated coolant with need-release filters, say both Eaton and Brisk, can last to overhaul, even if that’s 900,000 or 1,000,000 miles. Lab tests verify the safe use of the coolant to those mileages.


For more information, contact:

Amalgatech
(602) 252-0280
www.amalgatech.com

Castrol Heavy Duty Coolants
(800) 777-1466
www.castrol.com

Caterpillar Engine Div.
(309) 675-1000
www.caterpillar.com

ChevronTexaco Corp.
(415) 894-7700
www.chevrontexaco.com

CRC Industries
(800) 272-8963
www.crcindustries.com

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