Beam ‘em Up

| October 03, 2001

Captain Cecil Lancaster of the Tuscaloosa Police Department helped officers direct traffic on Rice Mine Road while the beams were hauled in during the morning rush hour. Some early-morning commuters sat in traffic for 30 minutes.

“We all want new bridges and new roadways built, and unfortunately, we have to pay a price to get them,” Lancaster says.

The drivers for Garrison call themselves “The Camel Crew,” Stover says. They can’t pull off the road just anywhere, and have to go long distances before they are allowed to stop.

“We’re like a camel that way,” Stover says. “We just keep going and it may be a while before we can eat and refuel.”

Stover’s job is challenging. The largest beam he has hauled was 144 feet long. His company also transports concrete power poles, manholes, sand and gravel. He says his job is interesting, and he enjoys making friends with the bridge crews.

“The best part is taking my kids on a ride across a bridge after it’s built and saying, ‘I hauled that in.’”

Beam 'em Up

| October 03, 2001

Captain Cecil Lancaster of the Tuscaloosa Police Department helped officers direct traffic on Rice Mine Road while the beams were hauled in during the morning rush hour. Some early-morning commuters sat in traffic for 30 minutes.

“We all want new bridges and new roadways built, and unfortunately, we have to pay a price to get them,” Lancaster says.

The drivers for Garrison call themselves “The Camel Crew,” Stover says. They can’t pull off the road just anywhere, and have to go long distances before they are allowed to stop.

“We’re like a camel that way,” Stover says. “We just keep going and it may be a while before we can eat and refuel.”

Stover’s job is challenging. The largest beam he has hauled was 144 feet long. His company also transports concrete power poles, manholes, sand and gravel. He says his job is interesting, and he enjoys making friends with the bridge crews.

“The best part is taking my kids on a ride across a bridge after it’s built and saying, ‘I hauled that in.’”

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