Bigger and better

| October 05, 2005

The competition was held during the Great American Trucking Show in Dallas, which ended Aug. 27.

Other winners were:

PARTICIPANTS’ CHOICE:2001 Freightliner XL132, Mark Pounds
CHARITY’S CHOICE: 1995 Peterbilt 379, Camille and Eric Carnaggio
CONVENTIONAL BOBTAIL 1998-2000: 1st (tie) 2000 Kenworth W900, Thomas and Maryann Quick; 1st (tie) 2000 Peterbilt 379, John Schmitz; 2nd (tie) 2000 Kenworth W900, Cindy Stowe; 2nd (tie) 1999 Peterbilt 379, John Wesley Perry
CONVENTIONAL BOBTAIL 2001-2002: 1st 2001 Peterbilt 379, Lee Little; 2nd 2001 Peterbilt 379, Truett Novosad; 3rd 2001 Kenworth W900-L, Jeff Hamilton
CONVENTIONAL BOBTAIL 2003-2004: 1st 2003 Peterbilt 379, Dave and Vicki Weldon; 2nd 2003 Peterbilt 379, George (Rusty) Conn; 3rd 2003 Kenworth W900L, Daryl Rodman
CONVENTIONAL BOBTAIL 2005-Newer; 1st 2005 Peterbilt 379, Mike Ladd; 2nd 2005 Peterbilt 379, Terry Weir Jr.; 3rd 2005 International 9900ix, Carol Ann Schlussler
FLEET-OWNED BOBTAIL: 1st (tie) 2000 Peterbilt 379, Terry and Clint Dicks; 1st (tie) 2006 Volvo VNL 780, James Thomas; 2nd 1996 Peterbilt 379, David Kosar; 3rd 2006 Peterbilt 379, Art Clubb
FLEET-OWNED COMBINATION: 1st 2005 Peterbilt 379, Thomas Ritterbach; 2nd 2005 Peterbilt 379, Danny Wolf; 3rd 2005 Freightliner Century, Jim Derkson
CUSTOM PAINT MURAL BOBTAIL: 1st 2003 International 9900ix, Harvey and Karen Zander; 2nd 2000 Freightliner Classic, Robert and Shelly Brinker
CUSTOM PAINT MURAL COMBINATION: 1st 2002 Peterbilt 379, Terry Moore; 2nd 2003 Western Star 4964EX, Lester Sullivan
CUSTOM PAINT NON-MURAL: 1st 1986 Peterbilt 359, Tim Thornhill; 2nd 2000 Peterbilt 379, Terry and Clint Dicks; 3rd 2001 Freightliner XL132, Mark Pounds
1984-1991 COMBINATION: 1st 1986 Peterbilt 359, Jeff Hardage
1994-1999 COMBINATION: 1st 1995 Peterbilt 379, Thomas and Kim Turner; 2nd 1994 Kenworth WL900, Richard Harper; 3rd 1998 Peterbilt 379, Calvin Long
2000-NEWER COMBINATION: 1st 2002 Peterbilt 379, Wayne Baker; 2nd 2006 Peterbilt 379X, Phil Wiebe; 3rd 2006 Peterbilt 379, George Elosegui
CABOVER COMBINATION: 1st 1981 Peterbilt 362, Robert Young; 2nd 1987 Freightliner 9642T, Mark Pounds
ANTIQUE: 1st 1969 Peterbilt 359, Brett Wilkins; 2nd 1963 Mack B-83, Eric Hardage
ENGINE: 1st 1986 Peterbilt 359, Tim Thornhill; 2nd 2002 Peterbilt 379, Wayne Baker; 3rd 2003 International 9900ix, Harvey and Karen Zander
CUSTOM AFTERMARKET
INTERIOR: 1st 1995 Peterbilt 379, Thomas and Kim Turner; 2nd 2005 Freightliner M2 112, Donald and Yvonne Gibson; 3rd 2000 Freightliner Classic XL, David and Cindy Cloud
INTERIOR OEM SLEEPER: 1st 2003 International 9900ix, Harvey and Karen Zander; 2nd (tie) 2000 Peterbilt 379, Terry and Clint Dicks; 2nd (tie) 1994 Kenworth WL900, Richard Harper; 3rd 2000 Kenworth W900, Tom and Maryann Quick
INTERIOR EXCLUDING SLEEPER: 1st 1986 Peterbilt 359, Tim Thornhill; 2nd 2003 Peterbilt 379, Dave and Vicki Weldon; 3rd 2001 Peterbilt 379, Truett Novosad
PETERBILT COUNCIL OF CLASS: 1st 1995 Peterbilt 379, Camille and Eric Carnaggio; 2nd 2000 Peterbilt 379, Terry and Clint Dicks; 3rd 2005 Peterbilt 379, Terry Weir, Jr.
SPECIALTY: 1st 1995 Peterbilt 379, Camille and Eric Carnaggio; 2nd 2005 Peterbilt 379, Paul Stanchio; 3rd 2005 Freightliner M2 112, Donald and Yvonne Gibson
BRIDGESTONE-FIRESTONE MOST TECHNOLOGICALLY ADVANCED CAB: 1st 2005 Freightliner M2 112, Donald and Yvonne Gibson; 2nd 2005 Peterbilt 379, Larry Christopherson; 3rd 1995 Peterbilt 379, Thomas and Kim Turner
-Lance Orr


Eight on the Break
No more five on, five off. Most other split-time scenarios will also soon come to an end. It’s now eight and two or 10 straight.

The new hours-of-service regulations will require all drivers using sleeper berths to satisfy their mandatory rest requirements by taking at least eight consecutive hours off duty and another two consecutive hours off duty throughout the work day.

The rule announced Aug. 19 by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration also grants two work days of up to 16 hours within a week to short-haul drivers operating within 150 air miles of their base and returning home each night, provided the equipment is smaller than that requiring a commercial driver’s license. Such operations may use payroll time sheets rather than log books for compliance purposes.

“We hope this new rule ends the uncertainty that the enforcement community and the industry have experienced regarding hours of service,” said FMCSA Administrator Annette Sandberg. “We are confident that these regulations are an important step toward highway safety and will prevent motor carrier crashes.”

The sleeper berth and short-haul provisions were the only two significant changes under the new regulations, which take effect Oct. 1. FMCSA announced a transition period through Dec. 31.

“The research shows that this new rule will improve driver health and safety and the safety of our roadways,” Sandberg said. “Ensuring drivers obtain necessary rest and restorative sleep will save lives.”

The new rule on sleeper use makes no distinction between solo and team drivers. The rule currently in place allows drivers to split a minimum of 10 hours’ rest in a sleeper berth in any combination of two periods, provided the shortest period is at least two hours. Drivers not using sleeper berths for mandatory rest still must take 10 consecutive hours off duty.
The short-haul rule that took effect in January 2004 allowed one workday of up to 16 hours for short-haul drivers, but no distinction was made based on the type of equipment. Short-haul drivers operating smaller equipment represent about half of all commercial truck registrations but only 10 percent of truck crashes and only 7 percent of fatal truck crashes, Sandberg said.

This latest revision of the hours rule results from a lawsuit by Citizens for Safe and Reliable Highways, Parents Against Tired Truckers and Public Citizen. A federal appeals court judge ruled in July 2004 that FCMSA had to rewrite the rule because it had failed to consider driver health in devising it.

In its revision, the agency indeed focused on driver health, Sandberg said. The rule changes were based on research by the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, which collected data from 87 drivers using in-cab monitoring equipment, as well as 1,000 health research articles, Sandberg said. The agency also gave consideration to approximately 1,800 public comments.

The other controversial provisions of the current rule, such as 11 hours of driving time and the 34-hour restart of cumulative rest, remain justified by the need to protect both public safety and the vitality of the U.S. economy, Sandberg said.

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