CARB approves $40M for clean vehicle purchases

| July 22, 2011

The California Air Resources Board on July 21 approved up to $40 million for the third year of funding to promote the purchase of next-generation clean cars, trucks and off-road equipment.

Californians will be able to use vouchers or rebates on a first-come first-served basis toward the purchase of zero-emissions or plug-in hybrid cars and zero-emissions or hybrid trucks and buses.

“This money is going to put thousands of ultra-clean vehicles on our roads within the year,” said CARB Chairman Mary Nichols.

CARB approved the following funding:
• $15 million to $21 million for continued funding of consumer rebates of up to $2,500 toward the purchase of zero-emissions or plug-in hybrid passenger vehicles;
• $11million to $16 million to continue providing vouchers for California businesses to buy lower-emitting and fuel-efficient hybrid and zero-emission trucks and buses; and
• $2 million to $3 million toward promising locomotive, truck and bus technology demonstration projects needed for California to meet its long-term air quality goals.

The Air Quality Improvement Program invests in new emissions-reduction technologies. In its first two years, the program funded about 2,000 zero-emissions passenger vehicles and more than 1,000 hybrid and zero-emissions trucks and buses, totaling $58 million. Funding for these programs is generated from expected revenues from smog abatement, vehicle and vessel registration fees.

A waitlist has been established for zero-emissions or plug-in hybrid passenger vehicle rebates to ensure the additional rebates will be distributed fairly on a first-come first-served basis in the fall. The funding also provides about $100 million annually to the California Energy Commission for projects that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote fuel diversity, and up to $30 million annually to the Bureau of Automotive Repair for voluntary passenger vehicle scrappage programs. The programs will sunset in 2015 unless they are reauthorized.


  • Louis Broussard

    California (State of) is broke and asking for Federal bailout. Doesn’t this mean that our (US taxpaying citizens) will be paying the 40 million$ for CA residents to get newer vehicles? How much of that money actually gets to the consumer and how much goes to “administrative costs”. I’d like to keep more of my tax dollars to buy a newer vehicle myself. Is it too much to ask the government to stop spending so much, lower taxes, and let me spend my own money where it is needed the most?