DOT Plans Grants for Hazmat Training

| December 03, 2001

The U.S. Department of Transportation will give $12.8 million to states, territories and Native American tribes for hazmat planning and training, the agency announced Oct. 1.

The funds are being made available through the U.S. DOT’s Research and Special Programs Administration. U.S. Transportation Secretary Norman Y. Mineta said the DOT hopes to raise the level of preparedness among the country’s emergency workers.

“RSPA’s hazardous materials emergency training program is a valuable tool in our effort to improve safety, helping emergency responders to be better prepared in case of hazardous materials incidents,” Mineta said.

The grant program is funded by user fees paid by shippers and carriers of hazardous materials. Since 1993, approximately 960,000 responders and others have received training assistance nationwide using grant funds from the program. Assistance was also provided to 4,000 local emergency planning committees in preparing and exercising hazmat response plans and in conducting studies that identify transportation hazards.

Other federal agencies participating include the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy, Department of Labor and Department of Health and Human Services.

California will receive the largest grant, $964,316. Texas ($668,460), Illinois ($612,982), Ohio ($510,751) and New York ($470,968) round out the top five.

DOT Plans Grants for Hazmat Training

| December 03, 2001

The U.S. Department of Transportation will give $12.8 million to states, territories and Native American tribes for hazmat planning and training, the agency announced Oct. 1.

The funds are being made available through the U.S. DOT’s Research and Special Programs Administration. U.S. Transportation Secretary Norman Y. Mineta said the DOT hopes to raise the level of preparedness among the country’s emergency workers.

“RSPA’s hazardous materials emergency training program is a valuable tool in our effort to improve safety, helping emergency responders to be better prepared in case of hazardous materials incidents,” Mineta said.

The grant program is funded by user fees paid by shippers and carriers of hazardous materials. Since 1993, approximately 960,000 responders and others have received training assistance nationwide using grant funds from the program. Assistance was also provided to 4,000 local emergency planning committees in preparing and exercising hazmat response plans and in conducting studies that identify transportation hazards.

Other federal agencies participating include the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy, Department of Labor and Department of Health and Human Services.

California will receive the largest grant, $964,316. Texas ($668,460), Illinois ($612,982), Ohio ($510,751) and New York ($470,968) round out the top five.

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