Fit for the Road

| May 13, 2002

Spending most of your days working hard to pick up or deliver a load on a tight schedule leaves little time to worry about eating balanced meals, exercising or maintaining healthy stress levels.

A new book by Dr. Joanne Lichten, How to Stay Healthy & Fit on the Road, offers guidelines for people whose jobs keep them on the highway and out of the gym or health food store.

In her book, touted as “the ultimate health guide for road warriors,” Lichten covers topics such as eating healthy in restaurants, getting enough sleep, exercising and staying connected to family and friends.

As a touring public speaker, Lichten is on the road 100 days out of the year. Lichten says when she first began traveling in 1994, she started putting on extra pounds due to frequent restaurant visits and never having the time or a place to exercise. Thus began her pursuit to find ways to stay healthy on the road.

“Truckers are eating out for breakfast, lunch and dinner,” Lichten says. “And I want people to know they can eat out and still eat healthy. Restaurants get bad raps, but you have to know what to order, and there are lots of options and simple modifications you can make that will help you fit in that seat a little better.”

Lichten suggests that truckers have a bottle of water and fresh fruits and vegetables to snack on in the cab. In her book she also offers ways to work out while on the road which include different exercises for various situations from a hotel room to a rest area.

“The sleep chapter will also really apply to truckers,” Lichten says. “It tells you how to drown out loud noise and get a good night’s sleep.”

The guidebook goes beyond physical well being to address mental health. Lichten gives tips for maintaining a healthy stress level as well as staying connected to family when on the road.

Lichten writes that the two important parts of keeping in touch with loved ones are taking reminders of home along on your haul – such as pictures of family members – and leaving behind reminders of you at home in the form of notes and messages around the house.

The pocket-sized book is available in bookstores nationwide and online.

Fit for the Road

| May 13, 2002

Spending most of your days working hard to pick up or deliver a load on a tight schedule leaves little time to worry about eating balanced meals, exercising or maintaining healthy stress levels.

A new book by Dr. Joanne Lichten, How to Stay Healthy & Fit on the Road, offers guidelines for people whose jobs keep them on the highway and out of the gym or health food store.

In her book, touted as “the ultimate health guide for road warriors,” Lichten covers topics such as eating healthy in restaurants, getting enough sleep, exercising and staying connected to family and friends.

As a touring public speaker, Lichten is on the road 100 days out of the year. Lichten says when she first began traveling in 1994, she started putting on extra pounds due to frequent restaurant visits and never having the time or a place to exercise. Thus began her pursuit to find ways to stay healthy on the road.

“Truckers are eating out for breakfast, lunch and dinner,” Lichten says. “And I want people to know they can eat out and still eat healthy. Restaurants get bad raps, but you have to know what to order, and there are lots of options and simple modifications you can make that will help you fit in that seat a little better.”

Lichten suggests that truckers have a bottle of water and fresh fruits and vegetables to snack on in the cab. In her book she also offers ways to work out while on the road which include different exercises for various situations from a hotel room to a rest area.

“The sleep chapter will also really apply to truckers,” Lichten says. “It tells you how to drown out loud noise and get a good night’s sleep.”

The guidebook goes beyond physical well being to address mental health. Lichten gives tips for maintaining a healthy stress level as well as staying connected to family when on the road.

Lichten writes that the two important parts of keeping in touch with loved ones are taking reminders of home along on your haul – such as pictures of family members – and leaving behind reminders of you at home in the form of notes and messages around the house.

The pocket-sized book is available in bookstores nationwide and online.

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