Freightliner continues to increase market share

| February 18, 2014
The natural gas-powered Freightliner Cascadia — pictured here in the day cab model — will be available next year with a 48-inch sleeper.
Overdrive Equipment Editor Jack Roberts test-drove this Cummins ISX12-G, natural-gas-powered Freightliner Cascadia Evolution last year. Follow this link for results. 

Freightliner’s market share grew 4.2 percent last year, said Mark Lampert, retiring senior vice president of sales and marketing.

Lampert and other Daimler Trucks North America executives discussed the company’s market data during a press conference today in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico.

Of the 339,000 Class 6 through 8 trucks sold last year, Lampert said, DTNA accounted for 37.9 percent. That share should grow, based on extremely strong orders in January, said David Hames, general manager of marketing and strategy.

“DTNA took in the highest number of truck orders that we have seen since 2006,” he noted. “So we are off to a very strong start.”

Hames noted that DTNA finished 2013 with 31 percent vocational market share, which appears to be growing. “For Freightliner, ‘vocational’ is defined by what we refer to as the six super segments,” he explained. “They include specialized haul, utility, food and beverage, government, refuse and construction.”

Hames said DTNA is focusing on “vehicle integration” as opposed to “vertical integration.” 

Related

Evolution evolves: Freightliner adds gas power to Cascadia’s aero package

Napa Valley, Calif., has become an annual locale for Freightliner to present news and updates on various industry issues. And what’s the point of holding court if you don’t let folks take your trucks out for a spin?

“’Vertical integration’ suggests a focus on what’s good for the manufacturer,” he said. “And ‘vehicle integration’ focuses on what is in the customer’s best interest. And that is the philosophy that will drive our new product development.”

Hames noted that Detroit’s DD15 diesel engine was installed in 51 percent of Cascadias sold in 2013. In those sold this year, 69 percent have the engine.

  • Jim Kennedy

    Hmmm, discussing the customers’ best interests …. from Cabo, r u serious?

  • John S

    In the end companies and owner operators will have to sacrifice amenities to be able to afford to make profits in trucking. The increases in emission regulations that are ongoing will continue to not only affect what trucks are bought but how well they are accessorized. But alternative fuels are not going to significantly affect how trucking works for a while. The infrastructure is not there and the problems which their are problems with Natural Gas and electrics will prevent them from becoming common place.