Hauling for the Gold

| March 06, 2002

The 2002 Olympic Winter Games will be held this month in Salt Lake City, and the Olympic spirit will be evident nationwide as many use the Games for hope and encouragement during troubled times. But those who view the Olympics, whether at home or in person, may not give much thought to the preparation and hard work it took to make it happen.

Salt Lake City officials and several construction companies began planning and building venues years before they knew their city would be hosting the games. Since the Games were awarded to Salt Lake in 1995, countless products have been delivered, and additional venues and housing have been built. Truckers have shown their Olympic spirit by doing their jobs, delivering machinery and materials with their trucks.

Hauling for an Olympic Stadium
Jason Bryan has driven for CWX of Salt Lake City for six years. Bryan delivered the first pallet of Olympic pins to the Salt Lake Organizing Committee. “That was pretty sweet,” he says.

CWX uses 24-foot trailers to maneuver around downtown Salt Lake City. Bryan has delivered guardrails, housing items, indoor lighting fixtures, cable, warehouse products and wire. The guardrails weighed 8,000 pounds, and their pallets were 10 feet long and 4 feet tall. Bryan began making the deliveries four years ago, and is anxious to see the Olympic Games unfold.

“It’s exciting,” he says. “If these products weren’t delivered, then they wouldn’t be able to build the venues for the Olympics.”

Layton Construction in Salt Lake City rebuilt Rice-Eccles Stadium, which will be used for the opening and closing ceremonies, and also built the speed skating oval.

The original Rice-Eccles Stadium was built in 1926 and used by the University of Utah to host its football games. Layton was hired by the university to rebuild the stadium, and the Salt Lake Organizing Committee will pay the university to use the stadium for 14 days.

The old stadium was completely demolished within 45 days, and it took nine months to rebuild it. The project began after the last football game in November 1997 and was finished in September 1998.

“The old stadium basically came down,” says Alan Rindlisbacher, Layton’s director of corporate marketing. “The new press box is at the same height as the old lights were. We had nine months to demolish and rebuild a stadium. With a major project like that you’re always going to have some challenges that creep up on you and give you fits.”

The brick towers on the front of the stadium are covered in red sandstone derived from stone quarries in India. “Utah sandstone is more porous,” he says. “It’s less hard than this Indian sandstone.”

Scanada International supplied Layton jacking equipment, related hardware and designs to slipform three separate concrete stair/elevator towers for the new Rice-Eccles Stadium. The slip forms were delivered from the company’s Iowa warehouse by truck, and the one for the northeast tower weighed 4,000 pounds. The slip forms for the north and south towers weighed 48,000 pounds. The towers are 180 feet high.

According to Bryan Keith, Layton’s manager of project buying and equipment, the slip forms rose a foot an hour, and it took seven days of non-stop work to complete the towers on time. The crew stood on top of the work platform as the slip form rose and concrete formed inside.

Hauling for the Gold

| March 06, 2002

The 2002 Olympic Winter Games will be held this month in Salt Lake City, and the Olympic spirit will be evident nationwide as many use the Games for hope and encouragement during troubled times. But those who view the Olympics, whether at home or in person, may not give much thought to the preparation and hard work it took to make it happen.

Salt Lake City officials and several construction companies began planning and building venues years before they knew their city would be hosting the games. Since the Games were awarded to Salt Lake in 1995, countless products have been delivered, and additional venues and housing have been built. Truckers have shown their Olympic spirit by doing their jobs, delivering machinery and materials with their trucks.

Hauling for an Olympic Stadium
Jason Bryan has driven for CWX of Salt Lake City for six years. Bryan delivered the first pallet of Olympic pins to the Salt Lake Organizing Committee. “That was pretty sweet,” he says.

CWX uses 24-foot trailers to maneuver around downtown Salt Lake City. Bryan has delivered guardrails, housing items, indoor lighting fixtures, cable, warehouse products and wire. The guardrails weighed 8,000 pounds, and their pallets were 10 feet long and 4 feet tall. Bryan began making the deliveries four years ago, and is anxious to see the Olympic Games unfold.

“It’s exciting,” he says. “If these products weren’t delivered, then they wouldn’t be able to build the venues for the Olympics.”

Layton Construction in Salt Lake City rebuilt Rice-Eccles Stadium, which will be used for the opening and closing ceremonies, and also built the speed skating oval.

The original Rice-Eccles Stadium was built in 1926 and used by the University of Utah to host its football games. Layton was hired by the university to rebuild the stadium, and the Salt Lake Organizing Committee will pay the university to use the stadium for 14 days.

The old stadium was completely demolished within 45 days, and it took nine months to rebuild it. The project began after the last football game in November 1997 and was finished in September 1998.

“The old stadium basically came down,” says Alan Rindlisbacher, Layton’s director of corporate marketing. “The new press box is at the same height as the old lights were. We had nine months to demolish and rebuild a stadium. With a major project like that you’re always going to have some challenges that creep up on you and give you fits.”

The brick towers on the front of the stadium are covered in red sandstone derived from stone quarries in India. “Utah sandstone is more porous,” he says. “It’s less hard than this Indian sandstone.”

Scanada International supplied Layton jacking equipment, related hardware and designs to slipform three separate concrete stair/elevator towers for the new Rice-Eccles Stadium. The slip forms were delivered from the company’s Iowa warehouse by truck, and the one for the northeast tower weighed 4,000 pounds. The slip forms for the north and south towers weighed 48,000 pounds. The towers are 180 feet high.

According to Bryan Keith, Layton’s manager of project buying and equipment, the slip forms rose a foot an hour, and it took seven days of non-stop work to complete the towers on time. The crew stood on top of the work platform as the slip form rose and concrete formed inside.

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