Internet Truckstop: Load availability falls

| December 13, 2011

In its latest newsletter, Internet Truckstop reported load availability nationally decreased 11 percent in the latest week from the previous week.

Load searching, however, increased 11 percent from the previous week, the ITS Trans4Cast Letter reported.

The load board service provider identified “hot regions” in the latest week as Alabama, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas and Wisconsin.

The least load availability was found in areas that included New England states Connecticut and Vermont, New Mexico and Washington, D.C.

Truck availability increased 10 percent from the previous week. The most truck availability appeared in areas including California, Florida and Texas, while fewer trucks were available in Montana, West Virginia, Wyoming and Washington, D.C. Truck searching declined 17 percent from the previous week, ITS said.

Among other market trends, overall average equipment rates fell 3 percent to $2.05 from $2.10. Van rates dropped 10 percent to $1.74 a mile from $1.93 from the previous week. Flatbed rates declined slightly to $1.95 from $1.96, while reefer rates dipped 2 percent to $1.98 from $2.02.

According to ITS, inbound rates dropped 2 percent to $1.99 from $2.03. New England, New York and Washington, D.C., had the highest inbound rates, averaging $2.34 a mile. Midwest states and California were among states with the lowest inbound rates, averaging $1.75 a mile.

Outbound rates decreased 1 percent to $1.94 a mile from $1.96 the previous week. Midwest states, upper Southern states and Washington, D.C., had the highest outbound rates of an average $2.34 a mile. On the opposite end, places such as Alabama, New Jersey, Colorado and Florida had the lowest outbound rates at an average $1.72 a mile, ITS reported.

  • M S

    According to the articular, “The most truck availability appeared in areas including California, Florida and Texas”.

    This leaves it wide open for speculation, based on observation. This story should be no surprise to anyone. These states are loaded with people from the south. My take, based on observation of what’s going on in Southern CA, is that people from the south are being pulled up by their friends and family, and they get into a truck driving job.

  • kc connors

    My take on the people from the South would be that they work for a lower rate of compensation because where they live, cost-of-living is not like the northern states

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