IROC: Best of the Best

| August 02, 2001

“Our first priority is to make sure all the cars are equal,” says IROC President Jay Signore, who directs the series’ staff of 25 mechanics, fabricators and workers.

“Every part is the same. Each car is built exactly the same way. When the cars go to the track, they are as equal as is humanly possible.”

Stock car veteran Dick Trickle serves as a test driver for IROC, and he recently spent time at Talladega Superspeedway to get cars ready for round two of the 2001 series. He, too, is sold on IROC.

“IROC is the cleanest, safest operation I’ve ever seen,” Trickle says. “The cars run great, and when the race starts, these things will already be good to go for the drivers. They’re so much fun to drive, we’ve basically raced in them at practice.” Goodyear, Lazier, Brack, Cheever and Green all put the cars through the motions two days before competing in Talladega, joining Trickle and the test drivers.

“I haven’t raced here before, so just getting here and getting an opportunity to run on this track is a thrill,” Goodyear says. “I’ve watched it on TV for years. It’s only my second IROC race or race with any kind of roof on the car. For me, it’s exciting.”

Green, who knows all about driving with a roof, likes the feel of his machine.

“These cars are about five seconds slower than we run, but the cars drive awesome,” he says. “They’ve got a bunch of laps on the tires, but they still feel like they’ve got brand new tires on them.

“It’s just who helps you and who doesn’t that determines what happens in the race.”

In the Pits
When fans watch a NASCAR Winston Cup race, their eyes are focused on the driver. They watch the passes and the inside maneuvers, and they watch their favorite pilots defy the laws of physics by going four wide in places where they should be going three wide. A driver is like a quarterback in the spotlight in football. Neither can get the job done without their teammates. As in football, there is an entire team responsible for success or failure in racing.

The leader is the crew chief, who oversees the entire operation. Not only is he responsible for what goes on during race day, but he has to make sure the car is battle-ready before it even hits the track.

For example, Paul Andrews is the crew chief for Steve Park, and he put the Pennzoil driver’s Chevrolet through the wringer during a test the week before the Talladega 500.

“We took two cars with us, and for no apparent reason, our new one just didn’t respond the way we would’ve liked,” Andrews said. “So, needless to say, we took it back to the shop and took it apart.”

Once everyone is running in a pack at 200 mph, the pit crew gets busy and stays that way from green flag to checker.

IROC: Best of the Best

| August 02, 2001

“Our first priority is to make sure all the cars are equal,” says IROC President Jay Signore, who directs the series’ staff of 25 mechanics, fabricators and workers.

“Every part is the same. Each car is built exactly the same way. When the cars go to the track, they are as equal as is humanly possible.”

Stock car veteran Dick Trickle serves as a test driver for IROC, and he recently spent time at Talladega Superspeedway to get cars ready for round two of the 2001 series. He, too, is sold on IROC.

“IROC is the cleanest, safest operation I’ve ever seen,” Trickle says. “The cars run great, and when the race starts, these things will already be good to go for the drivers. They’re so much fun to drive, we’ve basically raced in them at practice.” Goodyear, Lazier, Brack, Cheever and Green all put the cars through the motions two days before competing in Talladega, joining Trickle and the test drivers.

“I haven’t raced here before, so just getting here and getting an opportunity to run on this track is a thrill,” Goodyear says. “I’ve watched it on TV for years. It’s only my second IROC race or race with any kind of roof on the car. For me, it’s exciting.”

Green, who knows all about driving with a roof, likes the feel of his machine.

“These cars are about five seconds slower than we run, but the cars drive awesome,” he says. “They’ve got a bunch of laps on the tires, but they still feel like they’ve got brand new tires on them.

“It’s just who helps you and who doesn’t that determines what happens in the race.”

In the Pits
When fans watch a NASCAR Winston Cup race, their eyes are focused on the driver. They watch the passes and the inside maneuvers, and they watch their favorite pilots defy the laws of physics by going four wide in places where they should be going three wide. A driver is like a quarterback in the spotlight in football. Neither can get the job done without their teammates. As in football, there is an entire team responsible for success or failure in racing.

The leader is the crew chief, who oversees the entire operation. Not only is he responsible for what goes on during race day, but he has to make sure the car is battle-ready before it even hits the track.

For example, Paul Andrews is the crew chief for Steve Park, and he put the Pennzoil driver’s Chevrolet through the wringer during a test the week before the Talladega 500.

“We took two cars with us, and for no apparent reason, our new one just didn’t respond the way we would’ve liked,” Andrews said. “So, needless to say, we took it back to the shop and took it apart.”

Once everyone is running in a pack at 200 mph, the pit crew gets busy and stays that way from green flag to checker.

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