IROC: Best of the Best

| August 02, 2001

Teams are allotted as many as eight crew members during the course of a given event – the catch can man, the tire changers, the jackman, the gas man, the tire carriers and an extra man.

The catch can man holds the can to collect any overflow from the fuel cell. Once the task is complete, he signals the jackman with his hand.

The tire changers each run to the car’s right side and use an air impact gun to remove the five lugnuts off the old tire and bolt on the new one. The process is quickly repeated on the left side of the machine.

The jackman carries a 45-pound hydraulic jack from the pit wall to raise the car’s right side. After new tires are bolted on, he drops the car to the ground and repeats the process on the left side.

The gas man pours two 11-gallon cans of fuel into the 22-gallon fuel cell. While it might look easy, the cans weigh 75 pounds.

All the jobs are important, but the tire carriers probably feel the most pressure of any of the crew members. They are each charged with carrying a new 75-pound tire to the car’s right side and placing each on the wheel after the tire changer removes the old tire. The process is repeated on the left side with new tires rolled to them by crew members located behind the pit wall.

Finally, there is an extra man in some pits. He is one of the crew members located behind the pit wall who is allowed to come out and clean the windshield and/or service the driver. His duties are occasional and entirely at the discretion of NASCAR.

Once this organized chaos is complete, the cars speed back on the track and battle for position. And once the caution flag flies, the process starts all over again.

While not technically a crew member, a race team’s spotter also has an essential job. He must coach the driver through traffic and warn of any impending trouble.

“You look for the advertisement these drivers make when they put the cars three and four wide in the turns,” says Bart Creasman, the spotter for Bobby Hamilton and Square D Racing and the team’s transport driver. “These drivers get anxious, but patience is the key.”


MEET THE DRIVERS

Elliott Sadler
DOB: 4/30/75
Resides: Mooresville, N.C.

Drives the Motorcraft Ford for the Wood Brothers.

Picked up his first career win in 2001, just his third full-time season in Winston Cup competition. In 1999 he finished second to Tony Stewart in Rookie of the Year Standings.

The 28th pilot to drive for the Wood Brothers, Sadler is the younger brother of Busch Series veteran Hermie Sadler, while his father, Herman, raced late model cars in Virginia.

IROC: Best of the Best

| August 02, 2001

Teams are allotted as many as eight crew members during the course of a given event – the catch can man, the tire changers, the jackman, the gas man, the tire carriers and an extra man.

The catch can man holds the can to collect any overflow from the fuel cell. Once the task is complete, he signals the jackman with his hand.

The tire changers each run to the car’s right side and use an air impact gun to remove the five lugnuts off the old tire and bolt on the new one. The process is quickly repeated on the left side of the machine.

The jackman carries a 45-pound hydraulic jack from the pit wall to raise the car’s right side. After new tires are bolted on, he drops the car to the ground and repeats the process on the left side.

The gas man pours two 11-gallon cans of fuel into the 22-gallon fuel cell. While it might look easy, the cans weigh 75 pounds.

All the jobs are important, but the tire carriers probably feel the most pressure of any of the crew members. They are each charged with carrying a new 75-pound tire to the car’s right side and placing each on the wheel after the tire changer removes the old tire. The process is repeated on the left side with new tires rolled to them by crew members located behind the pit wall.

Finally, there is an extra man in some pits. He is one of the crew members located behind the pit wall who is allowed to come out and clean the windshield and/or service the driver. His duties are occasional and entirely at the discretion of NASCAR.

Once this organized chaos is complete, the cars speed back on the track and battle for position. And once the caution flag flies, the process starts all over again.

While not technically a crew member, a race team’s spotter also has an essential job. He must coach the driver through traffic and warn of any impending trouble.

“You look for the advertisement these drivers make when they put the cars three and four wide in the turns,” says Bart Creasman, the spotter for Bobby Hamilton and Square D Racing and the team’s transport driver. “These drivers get anxious, but patience is the key.”


MEET THE DRIVERS

Elliott Sadler
DOB: 4/30/75
Resides: Mooresville, N.C.

Drives the Motorcraft Ford for the Wood Brothers.

Picked up his first career win in 2001, just his third full-time season in Winston Cup competition. In 1999 he finished second to Tony Stewart in Rookie of the Year Standings.

The 28th pilot to drive for the Wood Brothers, Sadler is the younger brother of Busch Series veteran Hermie Sadler, while his father, Herman, raced late model cars in Virginia.

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