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Overdrive Staff | September 01, 2011

— Jill Dunn



New service offers detailed used truck reports

RigDig, a new service, provides history reports to help prospective buyers evaluate used truck purchases.

By logging onto RigDig.com and typing in a truck’s vehicle identification number, buyers and sellers can get vital records on a commercial vehicle.

“The launch of RigDig marks the first time buyers can check a truck’s background using a service designed specifically for the commercial truck market,” says James Vogel, RigDig general manager, noting that the service “gives truck buyers a level of confidence in making purchase decisions that’s unprecedented.”

RigDig was developed by Equipment Data Associates, a division of Overdrive’s publisher, Randall-Reilly Business Media & Information. EDA has compiled equipment-related data in trucking and construction for more than 20 years.

RigDig reports, which cost $34 each or three for $60, alert buyers when the truck may be:

• Junk or salvage yard vehicle. Through RigDig’s partnership with the Department of Justice’s National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS), RigDig alerts buyers to trucks that have been in junk or salvage yards.

• Total loss insurance claims. RigDig can help the used truck buyer know if a vehicle was written off as a total loss before they buy or sell.

• DMV title brands, such as Junked, Salvage or Flooded. RigDig delivers title information in real-time.

• Involved in a federally recordable accident. RigDig’s database includes more than 639,000 federally recordable, tow-away accidents for Class 3-8 trucks (for valid VINs) since 2000.

• Involved in a less-severe, non-federally recordable accident. RigDig’s database includes more than 139,000 post-accident inspections for Class 3-8 vehicles since 2000.

• Properly maintained. Inspections or out-of-service violations are identified.

• Truck specifications. Original factory specifications are identified.

• UCC Liens. Buyers can verify if any Uniform Commercial Code liens were tied to a truck’s VIN.

— Staff reports



Bill would allow heavy trucks on all interstates

U.S. Senator Olympia J. Snowe (R-Maine) introduced The Commercial Truck Safety Act, legislation intended to ease interstate commerce and enhance safety on highways and secondary roads.

The bill would eliminate what Snowe identifies as inequitable government regulation permitting six-axle trucks weighing up to 100,000 pounds to travel on some states’ interstate highways and not others.

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