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Overdrive Staff | May 01, 2012

• John Neumeier of Russia, Ohio, who drives for Bohman Trucking. He was loading his milk delivery truck Nov. 14 when a car missed a curve on a nearby road and plunged into a pond. As the car began to sink, Neumeier grabbed a wrench, dove into the pond and broke the driver’s side window. He pulled the semi-conscious driver to shore.

— Staff reports

 

 

Cargo theft increases

Cargo theft in the United States increased 17 percent in 2011, says CargoNet, a collaboration of Verisk Analytics and the National Insurance Crime Bureau.

CargoNet’s report said 1,215 thefts were reported during 2011, up from 1,034 reported during 2010. After the 2010 report was released another 249 thefts were reported for the year. The 2011 total also could increase.

Of the 1,215 cargo theft incidents recorded for last year, 116 involved base metals, 229 electronics, 105 apparel and accessories and 200 included prepared foodstuffs and beverages.

Most cargo thefts occurred on Fridays (227), Saturdays (202) and Sundays (198). The favorite theft locations were truck stops, carrier/terminal lots and unsecured parking lots.

Cargo theft reporting is increasing and collaboration and data sharing among the insurance and transportation industries and law enforcement is improving, CargoNet said.

— Staff reports

 

 

Roadside inspector outlines top hazards

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration roadside inspector Carlos Saucedo named key problem areas for drivers, fleets and truck owners during the Mid-America Trucking Show in Louisville, Ky.

Saucedo, a former driver, said the top five driver violations are:

• Log book issues – either not current or signed or otherwise incomplete.

• Driver’s record of duty status isn’t current.

• Driver isn’t in possession of a medical certificate.

• Driver doesn’t speak English.

• Fleet requires or permits driver to drive after 14 hours on duty.

He said the top five driver out-of-service violations include the carrier requires or allows driver to drive after 14 hours on duty, false reports of driver record of duty status, no record of duty status, driver fails to retain logs for previous seven days and carriers requiring or allowing drivers to drive more than 11 hours.

Saucedo also identified top five vehicle violations:

• No or defective lighting devices or reflective material, as required.

• Required lamps are inoperative.

• Tire tread depth of less than 2/32-inch.

• Inspection or repair and maintenance of parts and accessories.

• Oil or grease leaks.

The top vehicle out-of-service violations are: inoperative turn signals; flat tire or exposed fabric; inspection or repair and maintenance of parts and accessories; inadequate brake tubing and hoses; and stop lamp violations.

Saucedo gave 10 pointers for passing roadside inspections, including being prepared; having a valid CDL; keeping current logs; driving within allowed hours of service; wearing a seatbelt; knowing the critical vehicle inspection items; having a professional attitude; keeping in mind BLT – brakes, lighting and tires; knowing the three P’s of hauling hazmat – papers, placards and packaging; and asking questions.

— James Jaillet

 

 

SHORT HAULS

SURFACE TRANSPORTATION between the U.S., Canada and Mexico increased 11.5 percent in January from a year ago to $75.5 billion, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation.

A FEDERAL COURT denied the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association’s cease and desist request, asking the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration to not encourage use of electronic onboard recorders until the agency issues new policy on the devices. The three-judge panel did not provide reasons for its denial.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1269137418 Mike Jones

    What they mean is INSURANCE COMPANIES are telling us what to do…and Helping to Write these Rules because they dont want to Pay Out one more Penny than necessary for Anything they are involved in……A Truck Driver will NOT blink his eyes without being MONITORED..Observed…and a Data Sheet prepared on his activities……….BIG Money behind ALL these rules…..nice and fluffy to call it “safety concerns”.