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Overdrive Staff | June 01, 2012

Bryan Price, CSA program manager for the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, spoke about the Compliance, Safety, Accountability program in March in Louisville, Ky., previewing some of the changes that are expected to take effect in July.

Possibly the biggest change in the revised Safety Management System is moving load securement violations from CSA’s cargo BASIC (behavior analysis and safety improvement) into the vehicle BASIC, Price said. That leaves only hazmat standards under cargo, and that BASIC will be renamed hazmat.

Flatbedders have considered the current system’s treatment of securement unfair because their load securement violations are much more obvious than those pulling dry vans or reefers, so the cargo BASIC disproportionately affects their CSA ratings. FMCSA agrees, Price said, and the securement violations in the new framework will have a smaller effect on carrier scores.

However, because of the change, carriers who haul hazmat only occasionally – as opposed to full-time hazmat carriers – may see their scores increase, meaning a less-safe score.

Carriers who haul hazmat just often enough to meet the hazmat BASIC standard will be inspected as such, and because the drivers aren’t regular hazmat haulers, will probably see an increase in violations.

Another change will be to more accurately assign violations involving intermodal equipment so that violations a driver should have addressed in a pre-trip inspection will be assigned to the carrier, not the intermodal equipment provider.

The changes can be previewed until the end of June on the CSA website at csa.fmcsa.dot.gov.

— Max Heine

 

SHORT HAULS

TRAFFIC SIGN replacement deadlines have been eliminated by the U.S. DOT, giving states and local governments the opportunity to replace traffic signs on an as-needed basis, instead of by a DOT-specified date.

 

 

Study: CARB fuel policies will kill 617,000 jobs

The California Trucking Association released a study in April that shows significant job losses directly attributable to the California Air Resources Board’s fuel policies. Goods movement and agriculture sectors especially will be hard hit if the policies are allowed to go into effect as currently designed, CTA says.

CTA says the report, titled “The Impact of the Low Carbon Fuel Standard and Cap-and-Trade Programs on California Retail Diesel Prices,” attempts to show the effect that CARB’s regulatory actions will have on the state’s retail diesel future. It projects a $6.69 per gallon price tag.

The average price difference between California and neighboring states would be $2.33 per gallon when accounting for taxes.

According to the study, between 2015 and 2020, these higher “California-only” diesel fuel costs will cause a loss of nearly 617,000 jobs in the containerized import sector, $68.5 billion in lost state domestic product, $21.7 billion in lost income and $5.3 billion in lost state and local taxes. CTA says the study states that a “California-only” diesel will put California’s transportation sector at a significant competitive disadvantage.

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