Making ‘em Fit

| May 28, 2001

Car haulers say loading and unloading is easy today thanks to better equipment. “Trailers have gotten better from what it used to be,” Wyatt says. “They are a breeze now compared to when I started.” Ledford agrees. “Equipment is a lot better,” he says. “When I started we had spring-back trailers. We didn’t have hydraulics.”

Changes in body styles and bigger vehicles also present challenges. “It’s harder to haul vans and some trucks because they are big and bulky,” Wyatt says. “You always have a danger of scraping the sides of the trailer.”

Ivey says a car hauler, whether he is loading, unloading or driving down the road, takes damaging a vehicle personally. “Any car hauler will tell you, he hates to damage a vehicle,” Ivey says. “It makes me literally sick to my stomach to damage something. The secret is to not get in a big hurry. After I load I always do a walk-around to check everything to make sure I didn’t miss something.”

“When I stop, I look at all my chains to make sure the tie-downs are secure, and then I don’t worry about it anymore while I’m on the road,” Wyatt says. “A lot of boys are afraid to haul cars, but I’ve been out here so many years, I don’t worry about it. I love it.”

Ivey says car haulers must learn to take personal responsibility, or they won’t be around very long.

“You have to know where you can go and where you can’t,” Ivey says. “You can’t get off the interstate to avoid a wreck. You can get into trouble. The job’s not for everybody. I’ve trained guys and tried to train guys.”

Wyatt say while the money is better than average for a driver, it’s the challenges and personal satisfaction that keep him on the road. “I pulled a dry box for five years, but I’d rather haul cars than anything,” Wyatt says. “It’s hard work, but I enjoy it. I enjoy trucking, and both go together.”

Ivey says that it gets in your blood. “I tried to quit a couple of times over the years, but I really like it.”

Making 'em Fit

| May 28, 2001

Car haulers say loading and unloading is easy today thanks to better equipment. “Trailers have gotten better from what it used to be,” Wyatt says. “They are a breeze now compared to when I started.” Ledford agrees. “Equipment is a lot better,” he says. “When I started we had spring-back trailers. We didn’t have hydraulics.”

Changes in body styles and bigger vehicles also present challenges. “It’s harder to haul vans and some trucks because they are big and bulky,” Wyatt says. “You always have a danger of scraping the sides of the trailer.”

Ivey says a car hauler, whether he is loading, unloading or driving down the road, takes damaging a vehicle personally. “Any car hauler will tell you, he hates to damage a vehicle,” Ivey says. “It makes me literally sick to my stomach to damage something. The secret is to not get in a big hurry. After I load I always do a walk-around to check everything to make sure I didn’t miss something.”

“When I stop, I look at all my chains to make sure the tie-downs are secure, and then I don’t worry about it anymore while I’m on the road,” Wyatt says. “A lot of boys are afraid to haul cars, but I’ve been out here so many years, I don’t worry about it. I love it.”

Ivey says car haulers must learn to take personal responsibility, or they won’t be around very long.

“You have to know where you can go and where you can’t,” Ivey says. “You can’t get off the interstate to avoid a wreck. You can get into trouble. The job’s not for everybody. I’ve trained guys and tried to train guys.”

Wyatt say while the money is better than average for a driver, it’s the challenges and personal satisfaction that keep him on the road. “I pulled a dry box for five years, but I’d rather haul cars than anything,” Wyatt says. “It’s hard work, but I enjoy it. I enjoy trucking, and both go together.”

Ivey says that it gets in your blood. “I tried to quit a couple of times over the years, but I really like it.”

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