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MATS 2014

James Jaillet

OOIDA’s Spencer: Driver treatment a key element in ‘driver image’

| March 27, 2014

Driver_PerformanceIn making the push for his group’s joint effort to build a new trucking and driver image initiative, Todd Spencer of the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association said while dealing with the issue of “driver image,” the industry as a whole needs to “deal honestly” with issues that impact drivers’ negatively, like pay and treatment by shippers and receivers.

Driver image is a two-sided issue, Spencer said: Part of image, he says, in addition to what the public and trucking outsiders think, is also what truck drivers think of themselves.

And how drivers think of themselves stems from how they’re treated by others in the trucking industry, like carriers and shippers and receivers, Spencer said.

Related

Trucking Moves America Forward campaign aimed at bettering industry, driver image

ACT 1 officially unveiled a new image campaign for the industry aimed at attracting drivers, educating the public about the industry’s ubiquitous role in American ...

“These are challenges that the trucking community itself has to be honest about and has to deal with,” Spencer said March 26 at the Mid-America Trucking Show while introducing a new industry-wide image campaign called Trucking Moves America Forward. “A lot of what makes drivers feel good about themselves is how they’re treated in the industry they work in.”

Trucking Moves America Forward will be part advertising blitz and part grassroots growth brought by social media presence and exposure through things like trailer wraps, said some of the spokespersons for the group at the MATS-held event.

The goal of the campaign is to build an image of drivers — as a means to attract new workers to the industry and change negative public perception — as working professionals in an industry that plays a huge role in the U.S. economy.

Spencer, who was one of about five speakers in a lineup that also included two drivers, talked about the key points of the theory behind the campaign (truckers are the foot soldiers of the industry that drives the economy), but he also took a more pointed approach in his address, pushing the American driver as the most important piece of trucking’s — and in many ways, the economy’s — puzzle.

Spencer didn’t offer specifics, but he did say carriers should consider how they pay drivers — either amount or structure — as a key pillar to showing drivers appreciation and helping boost their own self-image.

“Those behind the wheel [are] clearly the most important people in trucking. Without them we are absolutely nothing and without them this industry doesn’t exist,” he said. “If you want somebody to feel good about themselves and want them to make [driving] their future, give them a reason. Make them know they’re appreciated.”

Click here to see news coverage from March 26 about the Trucking Moves America Forward announcement.

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  • http://hyryan.com/ Hy Ryan

    Good topic. It is definitely a two-sided discussion. The more professional our drivers become, hopefully the interest increases for becoming a driver.

  • guest

    Lots of Ra Ra Ra…must have been going on at that ignorant meeting. The bulk of new drivers today are mexicans…..they speak spanish at the truckstops and proudly swagger around OUR truckstops as if they own OUR country…….they speak spanish on the CB RADIO and haveno regard for Americans or anything American…we constantly hear their battle cry “We are taking back our land”……theseguys are the fastest growing segment of the NEW IMAGE of today’s trucker……Segment 2 is the ELDERLY white guy who is hoping to retire Pronto…aftermany years of being Ripped Off by everyone he comes in contact with in trucking. Shippers, Receivers, Cops, Dispatchers…..all LAUGH at truckers and treat them like dirt…….Our future “trucker” is a low paid mexican…..this is the REAL IMAGE of todays trucking…..the Public is well aware justby LOOKING in the Window of most trucks in Calif, Nm, Az, Tx……there sits a mexican….some are here legally and many are NOT. The experienced American truckers are LEAVING in droves and being Driven OUT of trucking by our own GOVERNMENT. The new IMAGE program should at least be HONEST about what is happening in trucking.

  • guest

    You have to be Joking Ryan…..I see by yer photo you are an Executive sitting in your easy chair and paneled office?? You sure have a FEEL for todays trucking…you betcha……in your mind “professional” means Babysat, Monitored, Cop Observed??? Cameras and Speed limiters will make truckers “more professional”?? lol

  • http://hyryan.com/ Hy Ryan

    Sure, you got me. I am a big time executive. Thanks for all you’re doing helping out with the professional part of driving.
    Green light is on so I guess I can pull out now and head to my next stop.

  • Eric M

    NO real industry pay raise in the last 7 years as a matter of fact CPM rates have gone down back into the mid 30 CPM rate from what I see industry wide. Yet company’s want drivers with 5 years experience and want to pay them this, the same as a new driver will get fresh out of training..THAT is a major reason guys are leaving at least the OTR aspect of trucking. I don’t mind being gone, but I want compensated for being gone. And having to eat out of a cooler isn’t the answer. I you can’t pay a driver enough to where he or she can’t get two meals a day out of the truck, and they can still send a decent check home, you are not paying the driver enough.

    That being sadi..DRIVERS!!!!! Dress like the professional you want to be treated like, Sweat pants, sandals, crocs pajama pants etc IS NOT profession attire when out of the truck . PERIOD. You represent not only your company but the industry as a whole…LOOK like a professional.

  • Dale Parkes

    Perhaps we need to go to the European system. Adopt the Euro HOS as well as pay by hour and pay for ALL work done. It seems that Europe has laws requiring employers to treat employees more humanely than the USA.

  • jojo

    There are many issues that we should be concerned about. These issues directly affect our image. Ignoring these issues and falsely focussing on the Image is just Sweeping Us under the rug.
    DRIVERS WE ARE BEING IGNORED!!!!!!

    Three ways to send a message
    1. Inform your carrier and Congressman that you will be taking off at least 3 days during the week of 10/31 thru 11/7.
    2.Register to Vote and then start making calls to your elected officials in DC. Call 202-224-3121 and inform them of your issues.
    3. VOTE. I’m Shutting my truck DOWN 11/31 thru 11/7 TO MAKE SURE THAT MY VOICE IS HEARD!!!

    Why don’t you all Join Me!

    Pat Hockaday jojo859585@gmail.com

  • http://mexicotrucker.com/ Porter M. Corn

    Don’t pay guest any mind Hy Ryan… He’s a pathetic little loser whose wife or girlfriend ran off with a better endowed Mexican causing him to go batshit crazy in his mama’s basement…

  • Cliff Downing

    A major problem with driver respect is a lack of driver self respect. When a driver shows up and hasn’t and a bath is a week, clothes look like they just spent a season on the reality show Survivor, they are not clean shaven (yes, you can have facial hair trimmed and neat) and their hair looks like it came out of a mop bucket, pay and other little “Johnny, you’ve been a good little boy, so here’s a gold star to put on your truck” nonsense is not gong to change much of anything. Respect is not just something given, it has to be earned. And on the carriers part, respect is not just a once a year “driver appreciation” thing that includes a hamburger, some chips and a soda, and a banner that says “We Appreciate Our Drivers” while they spend the next 11 months bending those drivers over a barrel and giving it to them and telling them that is the way it is in trucking. Kinda hard for a driver to feel respect when a carrier doesn’t know how to plan freight to get a driver home AT LEAST every 10 days or sooner. No, no. Let they lack of operations skill be dumped on the driver and keep them out for weeks on end. And they wonder why so few people are interested in filling the seats.

  • Cliff Downing

    A major problem with driver respect is a lack of driver self respect. When a driver shows up and hasn’t and a bath is a week, clothes look like they just spent a season on the reality show Survivor, they are not clean shaven (yes, you can have facial hair trimmed and neat) and their hair looks like it came out of a mop bucket, pay and other little “Johnny, you’ve been a good little boy, so here’s a gold star to put on your truck” nonsense is not gong to change much of anything. Respect is not just something given, it has to be earned. And on the carriers part, respect is not just a once a year “driver appreciation” thing that includes a hamburger, some chips and a soda, and a banner that says “We Appreciate Our Drivers” while they spend the next 11 months bending those drivers over a barrel and giving it to them and telling them that is the way it is in trucking. Kinda hard for a driver to feel respect when a carrier doesn’t know how to plan freight to get a driver home AT LEAST every 10 days or sooner. No, no. Let they lack of operations skill be dumped on the driver and keep them out for weeks on end. And they wonder why so few people are interested in filling the seats.

  • Cliff Downing

    A major problem with driver respect is a lack of driver self respect. When a driver shows up and hasn’t and a bath is a week, clothes look like they just spent a season on the reality show Survivor, they are not clean shaven (yes, you can have facial hair trimmed and neat) and their hair looks like it came out of a mop bucket, pay and other little “Johnny, you’ve been a good little boy, so here’s a gold star to put on your truck” nonsense is not gong to change much of anything. Respect is not just something given, it has to be earned. And on the carriers part, respect is not just a once a year “driver appreciation” thing that includes a hamburger, some chips and a soda, and a banner that says “We Appreciate Our Drivers” while they spend the next 11 months bending those drivers over a barrel and giving it to them and telling them that is the way it is in trucking. Kinda hard for a driver to feel respect when a carrier doesn’t know how to plan freight to get a driver home AT LEAST every 10 days or sooner. No, no. Let they lack of operations skill be dumped on the driver and keep them out for weeks on end. And they wonder why so few people are interested in filling the seats.

  • Cliff Downing

    A major problem with driver respect is a lack of driver self respect. When a driver shows up and hasn’t and a bath is a week, clothes look like they just spent a season on the reality show Survivor, they are not clean shaven (yes, you can have facial hair trimmed and neat) and their hair looks like it came out of a mop bucket, pay and other little “Johnny, you’ve been a good little boy, so here’s a gold star to put on your truck” nonsense is not gong to change much of anything. Respect is not just something given, it has to be earned. And on the carriers part, respect is not just a once a year “driver appreciation” thing that includes a hamburger, some chips and a soda, and a banner that says “We Appreciate Our Drivers” while they spend the next 11 months bending those drivers over a barrel and giving it to them and telling them that is the way it is in trucking. Kinda hard for a driver to feel respect when a carrier doesn’t know how to plan freight to get a driver home AT LEAST every 10 days or sooner. No, no. Let they lack of operations skill be dumped on the driver and keep them out for weeks on end. And they wonder why so few people are interested in filling the seats.

  • Cliff Downing

    A major problem with driver respect is a lack of driver self respect. When a driver shows up and hasn’t and a bath is a week, clothes look like they just spent a season on the reality show Survivor, they are not clean shaven (yes, you can have facial hair trimmed and neat) and their hair looks like it came out of a mop bucket, pay and other little “Johnny, you’ve been a good little boy, so here’s a gold star to put on your truck” nonsense is not gong to change much of anything. Respect is not just something given, it has to be earned. And on the carriers part, respect is not just a once a year “driver appreciation” thing that includes a hamburger, some chips and a soda, and a banner that says “We Appreciate Our Drivers” while they spend the next 11 months bending those drivers over a barrel and giving it to them and telling them that is the way it is in trucking. Kinda hard for a driver to feel respect when a carrier doesn’t know how to plan freight to get a driver home AT LEAST every 10 days or sooner. No, no. Let they lack of operations skill be dumped on the driver and keep them out for weeks on end. And they wonder why so few people are interested in filling the seats.

  • Cliff Downing

    A major problem with driver respect is a lack of driver self respect. When a driver shows up and hasn’t and a bath is a week, clothes look like they just spent a season on the reality show Survivor, they are not clean shaven (yes, you can have facial hair trimmed and neat) and their hair looks like it came out of a mop bucket, pay and other little “Johnny, you’ve been a good little boy, so here’s a gold star to put on your truck” nonsense is not gong to change much of anything. Respect is not just something given, it has to be earned. And on the carriers part, respect is not just a once a year “driver appreciation” thing that includes a hamburger, some chips and a soda, and a banner that says “We Appreciate Our Drivers” while they spend the next 11 months bending those drivers over a barrel and giving it to them and telling them that is the way it is in trucking. Kinda hard for a driver to feel respect when a carrier doesn’t know how to plan freight to get a driver home AT LEAST every 10 days or sooner. No, no. Let they lack of operations skill be dumped on the driver and keep them out for weeks on end. And they wonder why so few people are interested in filling the seats.

  • Cliff Downing

    A major problem with driver respect is a lack of driver self respect. When a driver shows up and hasn’t and a bath is a week, clothes look like they just spent a season on the reality show Survivor, they are not clean shaven (yes, you can have facial hair trimmed and neat) and their hair looks like it came out of a mop bucket, pay and other little “Johnny, you’ve been a good little boy, so here’s a gold star to put on your truck” nonsense is not gong to change much of anything. Respect is not just something given, it has to be earned. And on the carriers part, respect is not just a once a year “driver appreciation” thing that includes a hamburger, some chips and a soda, and a banner that says “We Appreciate Our Drivers” while they spend the next 11 months bending those drivers over a barrel and giving it to them and telling them that is the way it is in trucking. Kinda hard for a driver to feel respect when a carrier doesn’t know how to plan freight to get a driver home AT LEAST every 10 days or sooner. No, no. Let they lack of operations skill be dumped on the driver and keep them out for weeks on end. And they wonder why so few people are interested in filling the seats.

  • Cliff Downing

    A major problem with driver respect is a lack of driver self respect. When a driver shows up and hasn’t and a bath is a week, clothes look like they just spent a season on the reality show Survivor, they are not clean shaven (yes, you can have facial hair trimmed and neat) and their hair looks like it came out of a mop bucket, pay and other little “Johnny, you’ve been a good little boy, so here’s a gold star to put on your truck” nonsense is not gong to change much of anything. Respect is not just something given, it has to be earned. And on the carriers part, respect is not just a once a year “driver appreciation” thing that includes a hamburger, some chips and a soda, and a banner that says “We Appreciate Our Drivers” while they spend the next 11 months bending those drivers over a barrel and giving it to them and telling them that is the way it is in trucking. Kinda hard for a driver to feel respect when a carrier doesn’t know how to plan freight to get a driver home AT LEAST every 10 days or sooner. No, no. Let they lack of operations skill be dumped on the driver and keep them out for weeks on end. And they wonder why so few people are interested in filling the seats.

  • Cliff Downing

    A major problem with driver respect is a lack of driver self respect. When a driver shows up and hasn’t and a bath is a week, clothes look like they just spent a season on the reality show Survivor, they are not clean shaven (yes, you can have facial hair trimmed and neat) and their hair looks like it came out of a mop bucket, pay and other little “Johnny, you’ve been a good little boy, so here’s a gold star to put on your truck” nonsense is not gong to change much of anything. Respect is not just something given, it has to be earned. And on the carriers part, respect is not just a once a year “driver appreciation” thing that includes a hamburger, some chips and a soda, and a banner that says “We Appreciate Our Drivers” while they spend the next 11 months bending those drivers over a barrel and giving it to them and telling them that is the way it is in trucking. Kinda hard for a driver to feel respect when a carrier doesn’t know how to plan freight to get a driver home AT LEAST every 10 days or sooner. No, no. Let they lack of operations skill be dumped on the driver and keep them out for weeks on end. And they wonder why so few people are interested in filling the seats.

  • Cliff Downing

    A major problem with driver respect is a lack of driver self respect. When a driver shows up and hasn’t and a bath is a week, clothes look like they just spent a season on the reality show Survivor, they are not clean shaven (yes, you can have facial hair trimmed and neat) and their hair looks like it came out of a mop bucket, pay and other little “Johnny, you’ve been a good little boy, so here’s a gold star to put on your truck” nonsense is not gong to change much of anything. Respect is not just something given, it has to be earned. And on the carriers part, respect is not just a once a year “driver appreciation” thing that includes a hamburger, some chips and a soda, and a banner that says “We Appreciate Our Drivers” while they spend the next 11 months bending those drivers over a barrel and giving it to them and telling them that is the way it is in trucking. Kinda hard for a driver to feel respect when a carrier doesn’t know how to plan freight to get a driver home AT LEAST every 10 days or sooner. No, no. Let they lack of operations skill be dumped on the driver and keep them out for weeks on end. And they wonder why so few people are interested in filling the seats.

  • Cliff Downing

    A major problem with driver respect is a lack of driver self respect. When a driver shows up and hasn’t and a bath is a week, clothes look like they just spent a season on the reality show Survivor, they are not clean shaven (yes, you can have facial hair trimmed and neat) and their hair looks like it came out of a mop bucket, pay and other little “Johnny, you’ve been a good little boy, so here’s a gold star to put on your truck” nonsense is not gong to change much of anything. Respect is not just something given, it has to be earned. And on the carriers part, respect is not just a once a year “driver appreciation” thing that includes a hamburger, some chips and a soda, and a banner that says “We Appreciate Our Drivers” while they spend the next 11 months bending those drivers over a barrel and giving it to them and telling them that is the way it is in trucking. Kinda hard for a driver to feel respect when a carrier doesn’t know how to plan freight to get a driver home AT LEAST every 10 days or sooner. No, no. Let they lack of operations skill be dumped on the driver and keep them out for weeks on end. And they wonder why so few people are interested in filling the seats.

  • Cliff Downing

    A major problem with driver respect is a lack of driver self respect. When a driver shows up and hasn’t and a bath is a week, clothes look like they just spent a season on the reality show Survivor, they are not clean shaven (yes, you can have facial hair trimmed and neat) and their hair looks like it came out of a mop bucket, pay and other little “Johnny, you’ve been a good little boy, so here’s a gold star to put on your truck” nonsense is not gong to change much of anything. Respect is not just something given, it has to be earned. And on the carriers part, respect is not just a once a year “driver appreciation” thing that includes a hamburger, some chips and a soda, and a banner that says “We Appreciate Our Drivers” while they spend the next 11 months bending those drivers over a barrel and giving it to them and telling them that is the way it is in trucking. Kinda hard for a driver to feel respect when a carrier doesn’t know how to plan freight to get a driver home AT LEAST every 10 days or sooner. No, no. Let they lack of operations skill be dumped on the driver and keep them out for weeks on end. And they wonder why so few people are interested in filling the seats.

  • Cliff Downing

    A major problem with driver respect is a lack of driver self respect. When a driver shows up and hasn’t and a bath is a week, clothes look like they just spent a season on the reality show Survivor, they are not clean shaven (yes, you can have facial hair trimmed and neat) and their hair looks like it came out of a mop bucket, pay and other little “Johnny, you’ve been a good little boy, so here’s a gold star to put on your truck” nonsense is not gong to change much of anything. Respect is not just something given, it has to be earned. And on the carriers part, respect is not just a once a year “driver appreciation” thing that includes a hamburger, some chips and a soda, and a banner that says “We Appreciate Our Drivers” while they spend the next 11 months bending those drivers over a barrel and giving it to them and telling them that is the way it is in trucking. Kinda hard for a driver to feel respect when a carrier doesn’t know how to plan freight to get a driver home AT LEAST every 10 days or sooner. No, no. Let they lack of operations skill be dumped on the driver and keep them out for weeks on end. And they wonder why so few people are interested in filling the seats.

  • Cliff Downing

    A major problem with driver respect is a lack of driver self respect. When a driver shows up and hasn’t and a bath is a week, clothes look like they just spent a season on the reality show Survivor, they are not clean shaven (yes, you can have facial hair trimmed and neat) and their hair looks like it came out of a mop bucket, pay and other little “Johnny, you’ve been a good little boy, so here’s a gold star to put on your truck” nonsense is not gong to change much of anything. Respect is not just something given, it has to be earned. And on the carriers part, respect is not just a once a year “driver appreciation” thing that includes a hamburger, some chips and a soda, and a banner that says “We Appreciate Our Drivers” while they spend the next 11 months bending those drivers over a barrel and giving it to them and telling them that is the way it is in trucking. Kinda hard for a driver to feel respect when a carrier doesn’t know how to plan freight to get a driver home AT LEAST every 10 days or sooner. No, no. Let they lack of operations skill be dumped on the driver and keep them out for weeks on end. And they wonder why so few people are interested in filling the seats.

  • steve4447

    A sad but basic fact is…That no one will respect you or ever treat you better than you respect and treat yourself…..

    People tend to value things based on what they pay for them after all they aren’t stupid and why did they pay a lot for something..Anything if it wasn’t worth it?..

    As long as Drivers are willing to give it away for free….they will take it and value the service at no more than that…Sadly …working a 20-22 hour day for 8 hours pay…does nothing to make anyone value for anything more than that….

    The Company and the shippers have always and will always say that they just can’t pay any more and that you will just have to absorb the increased costs….Look around you…Nobody else but The Driver has ever bought it…

    The cost of everything associated with trucking has gone up …fuel…Insurance…Tags..Maintenance….It goes on and on….But the Companies and shippers couldn’t sell any of them that line could they?…

    Plain and simple it was.. Pay The Increased Cost…Or …Get Out Of The Business…and guess what they ALL Did Just That!…

    If you want to work for free you can come and work for me…I know that I can always find something for you to do….

  • TruthHurts

    There is nothing “american” here…as a matter of fact I can’t recalled the last time someone called him/herself american…it’s all half irish, half this, half that, half & half…If you didn’t learn about history Mexico was all the way up to Wyoming and the rest was Native Americans. Don’t hate on those guys that come here to work hard as they keep our country moving too. If it bothers you get off your whinny lazy behind and learn another language and you will be even if not better. Or go flip burgers for minimum wage…By the way, “PRONTO” is a Spanish word.

  • guest

    Sure Jack, Hitler WAS going to take over the WORLD too…..The way it turned out AMERICANS and Allies kicked his ASS. This is AMERICA you ANUS….not mexico…..I have to follow Laws and Rules and these foreign CHUMPS do too…..One rule is to be DEPORTED. We have Tons of LEGAL immigrants WAITING to get into this country who have something REAL to offer..like SKILLS and education….you P.O.S. We dont NEED any of these dopes from MEXICO..YOU can go home With THEM. Things WERE different 500 years ago you pile of CRAP. The TRUTH is today AMERICANS have TAKEN this land and we OWN it. You can cry your little sissy eyes out about it you belly crawler….go back to your Teepee.

  • guest

    So True…..good comment!!

  • guest

    mexico is SEWER….maybe in ancient history it DID reach to Wyoming…..who cares? TODAY those PUKES come up here to Mooch and end up in our AMERICAN PRISONS. 30% of OUR prison population is illegal aliens…..why dont YOU research some CURRENT history and statistics…Pocohontas……who gives a DAMN about illegal foreigners???? YOU want to give OUR country away and Kiss invaders’ ASS?? YOU are a TRAITOR and belly crawling Turd. Fold up your stinking Teepee and head BACK to your homeland……you P.O.S. YOU are talking about when Columbus got here….things have changed you Anal Passage….go Die. YOU are an Un AMERICAN TRAITOR.

  • guest

    Oh its mr Corn who LIVES in MEXICO to the discussion…..Corny has LIVED in Meheeco for 15 years and has basically DENOUNCED all thing American……please STAY in meheeco you shmuck…..your opinions are ALL pro meheeco and everyone knows it by now you drooling imbicile….You are a total joke.

  • gregbo

    Always kinda amazes me when drivers decide that the problems with trucking are the fault of other drivers: they don’t “look professional”, they don’t speak good English, they’re too thin or too fat or whatever. As it happens, I pull a flatbed which is 100% touch freight. I handle filthy, 100 lb. tarps, rusty chains and binders, frozen straps, coil racks etc. in all kinds of weather. Have you ever tried to fold a tarp at 15 below zero with 30 mile an hour winds blowing off lake Michigan a half mile away? I have. Ever tarp a 48′ load on a sunny day at 105 degrees in long pants, long sleeved shirt, steel toed boots and safety vest because the shipper requires it? I have. If I look dirty and disheveled when I show up at the truck stop I hope all of you clean shaven, freshly showered, dry van drivers in your shorts and Hawaiin shirts can tolerate my presence.

  • fishnman

    Hey Gregbo. I have to say that there are indeed jobs where getting dirty is just a normal part of the day. It would be nearly impossible to remain clean, neat and dry while doing a job like yours.
    On the flip side, I think cliff was more likely referring to the less than motivated folks who are filthy and stink because they choose to not shower or wash their clothing.
    A hard working flatbed driver might not be able to avoid getting dirty, grimy and sweaty, but would you remain that way for days?
    The drivers who show up at a customer or walk into a truck stop having worn the same shirt for 3 days and that has 3 days worth of accumulated food stains and can be smelled from 5 ft. away are the ones that people remember, not the neat freshly showered driver that walks by

  • Eric M

    Ever heard of coveralls or a shower aftre you loaded??? 20 year flatbed/step RGN driver here. Nice try.

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