Remembering a True Legend

| May 29, 2001

While Osterland gave him his big break, it was the tandem of Earnhardt and Richard Childress that would result in the most dominant force in the modern area of Winston Cup.

Childress, a former driver himself, was a kindred spirit. The two became close friends, and whatever Earnhardt needed to be competitive, Childress provided.

Earnhardt drove 11 races for Childress in 1981, but after a two-year stint with Bud Moore, Earnhardt went with Childress full time in 1984. Their first Winston Cup title together came in 1986, and they won another one in 1987.

Earnhardt was on top of the stock car world again in 1990, 1991, 1993 and 1994. At the age of 43, Dale Earnhardt had won as many points titles as Petty, and he did so when NASCAR competition had reached its zenith.

In 1995, Earnhardt won five races but finished second in the points standings. He won two in 1996, and went winless for the first time in 16 seasons in 1997.

“Words cannot express the tremendous loss all of us at Richard Childress Racing feel at this time. Dale Earnhardt was much more than a racecar driver; he was a loving husband, proud father and great businessman. Dale was a friend, and we worked side by side and hunted together. I will miss him always, for he was the greatest.”
- car owner Richard Childress

In 1998, Earnhardt took just one checker, but it came in The Great American Race, marking the first time Earnhardt had ever won the season-opening Daytona 500.

In 1999, it was Talladega Superspeedway that proved to be the venue that saw Earnhardt get back on track, and by the end of the 2000 season, Earnhardt was poised to regain his status as the best in the business.
After winning the 2000 Winston 500, Earnhardt had 76 victories and went on to finish second behind Bobby Labonte for the Winston Cup title.

Dale Earnhardt, 49, was running third on the last lap of the 2001 Daytona 500. Tragically, it was a lap he would never complete.

“I am saddened by the untimely loss of this American legend and want to express my deepest sympathy to his family, friends and fans. Dale was an American icon who made great contributions to his sport. Dale’s legacy will live on for millions of Americans. He was an inspiration to many.”
- President George W. Bush

Park’s Tribute
With one lap to go in the Feb. 25 Dura-Lube 400 NASCAR Winston Cup Rockingham event, Steve Park decided to practice what his mentor preached – and the result was the Pennzoil Chevrolet pilot’s second career win on the circuit and first on an oval course.

Park, driving for Dale Earnhardt Inc., fought off a strong challenge from defending Winston Cup champion Bobby Labonte to take the checker and give DEI its second consecutive win. Park’s vehicle got loose down the stretch, and Labonte’s actually made contact with the wall. The result was a great finish to a race that served as yet another tribute to Earnhardt.

Remembering a True Legend

| May 29, 2001

While Osterland gave him his big break, it was the tandem of Earnhardt and Richard Childress that would result in the most dominant force in the modern area of Winston Cup.

Childress, a former driver himself, was a kindred spirit. The two became close friends, and whatever Earnhardt needed to be competitive, Childress provided.

Earnhardt drove 11 races for Childress in 1981, but after a two-year stint with Bud Moore, Earnhardt went with Childress full time in 1984. Their first Winston Cup title together came in 1986, and they won another one in 1987.

Earnhardt was on top of the stock car world again in 1990, 1991, 1993 and 1994. At the age of 43, Dale Earnhardt had won as many points titles as Petty, and he did so when NASCAR competition had reached its zenith.

In 1995, Earnhardt won five races but finished second in the points standings. He won two in 1996, and went winless for the first time in 16 seasons in 1997.

“Words cannot express the tremendous loss all of us at Richard Childress Racing feel at this time. Dale Earnhardt was much more than a racecar driver; he was a loving husband, proud father and great businessman. Dale was a friend, and we worked side by side and hunted together. I will miss him always, for he was the greatest.”
- car owner Richard Childress

In 1998, Earnhardt took just one checker, but it came in The Great American Race, marking the first time Earnhardt had ever won the season-opening Daytona 500.

In 1999, it was Talladega Superspeedway that proved to be the venue that saw Earnhardt get back on track, and by the end of the 2000 season, Earnhardt was poised to regain his status as the best in the business.
After winning the 2000 Winston 500, Earnhardt had 76 victories and went on to finish second behind Bobby Labonte for the Winston Cup title.

Dale Earnhardt, 49, was running third on the last lap of the 2001 Daytona 500. Tragically, it was a lap he would never complete.

“I am saddened by the untimely loss of this American legend and want to express my deepest sympathy to his family, friends and fans. Dale was an American icon who made great contributions to his sport. Dale’s legacy will live on for millions of Americans. He was an inspiration to many.”
- President George W. Bush

Park’s Tribute
With one lap to go in the Feb. 25 Dura-Lube 400 NASCAR Winston Cup Rockingham event, Steve Park decided to practice what his mentor preached – and the result was the Pennzoil Chevrolet pilot’s second career win on the circuit and first on an oval course.

Park, driving for Dale Earnhardt Inc., fought off a strong challenge from defending Winston Cup champion Bobby Labonte to take the checker and give DEI its second consecutive win. Park’s vehicle got loose down the stretch, and Labonte’s actually made contact with the wall. The result was a great finish to a race that served as yet another tribute to Earnhardt.

Comments are closed.