Speed limit increases approved in Michigan, split speeds remain in place

| January 10, 2017

Michigan could be increasing speed limits on at least 600 miles of interstate and 900 miles of U.S. and state highways in the next year after a new law was signed by Gov. Rick Snyder.

Truck drivers and other motorists traveling through Michigan could see speed limit increases on some highways over the next year following a set of bills signed into law by Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder.

The new laws would allow the Michigan Department of Transportation to increase the speed limit for trucks from 60 mph to 65 mph on at least 600 miles on interstate, while increasing the speed limit for cars from 70 mph to 75 mph on the same roadways. The law also allows MDOT to increase the speed limit on 900 miles of U.S. and state highways for all drivers from 55 mph to 65 mph.

The new speed limits would only go into effect if safety and engineering studies conducted by MDOT and the Michigan State Police show that 85 percent of drivers currently travel at the proposed speeds. The agencies have one year to conduct the studies, implement the new speed limits and post new speed limit signage, per the bill.

“Ensuring that all Michiganders are safe while operating vehicles on our state’s roadways is critically important, and these bills allow for appropriately increased speed limits on certain roadways after safety studies are conducted,” Snyder said.

3 comments
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OTRDriver
OTRDriver

The only thing this bill will do is allow a more server accident when it occurs. It will also create false statistics against commercial vehicles because they will need to deal with more passenger vehicles than if they were regulated at the same speed.