freight

Internet Truckstop launches re-branding effort at MATS

Internet Truckstop has a new look. The brand and online freight-matching service, operational for two decades, has become Truckstop.com. Chat negotiation features, also, is rolling out to board subscribers.

Read More

POLL: If any, which of these load services have you used?

This poll takes a survey of some of the load-matching-tech companies that have sprung up in recent years or have moved toward more automated technology platforms. Ever used one of these to successfully book a load? Tell us here.

Read More

Spot market demand weak on West Coast with port disruptions

As spot freight falls into a typical seasonal plateau, the West Coast port disruption throws a complication on top of it All throughout the Western regions things are slower, DAT reports.

Read More

New free load board on the way

Apex Capital pitches its new NextLoad.com load board as unique in delivering robust filtering/alert/search capability in a free board.

Read More

Spot market volume and van, flat rates edge up

According to DAT's analysis of the spot market for the week ending October 4, freight availability rebounded 1.5 percent at the close of the month and quarter.

Read More

FTR, Internet Truckstop to forecast spot market activity

FTR and Internet Truckstop announced a new strategic industry partnership to offer market analysis and specificity for both contract and spot freight segments by region and by trailer type.

Read More

POLL: What freight-matching service do you use most?

Read More

Major LTLs posting rates to uShip

Three top national LTL carriers – Con-way, Old Dominion and YRC – have committed to publishing rates on offer to uShip’s shipper-direct LTL spot rate marketplace, uShip reported.

Read More

uShip, eBay ink agreement on larger-than-parcel items

uShip will be a featured option for buyer-arranged transport in eBay categories were items of 150 lbs. or greater are common.

Read More

How to get access to military freight

A primer of doing business direct with the military -- or the 3PL contractor controlling almost half of general military freight -- to haul DOD loads.

Read More