Blogs

Home time: A trip into the neckwear vortex

"I'm fairly certain the Borg is alive and well and living in the bowels of an Ikea in Flagstaff ... wearing Ugg boots and a scarf."

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Fuel-tax dustup in MI (Can you spell I – F – T – A?)

Is it time to say goodbye to Michigan's retail diesel tax? If that means the governor getting his way, you might want to pray it stays.

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Reefer Madness: How will pot legalization affect trucking?

Let’s talk about pot for minute, shall we?

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Losing your sparkle

Beware the bad-day blues...

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Running around Cali: Martin Jez’ 1988 Pete cabover

California-based owner-operator Jez realized he'd need to upgrade his emissions system in the near term -- he delayed the need by, well, buying old.

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Historical significance in the Internet age

Are you familiar with the North Dakota "Great Nosehair Massacre of 1863?" Wendy's Internet connection is spotty, but she think she remembers it from American History class.

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Thursday roundup: CB vitality, more highway heroes

There is still no substitute for what the CB does well, illustrated by a recent coordinated rolling roadblock that resulted in an abducted child's rescue.

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Fiscal cliff deal improves depreciation benefits

Had no fiscal cliff action been taken, the terms would have reverted to limits that would have left little flexibility in using depreciation to manage income taxes.

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The story behind a song

It was never a hit like “Tom Sawyer” or “Limelight,” but one of the standout tracks on Rush’s seminal 1981 album Moving Pictures is a song that should be near and dear to any motoring fan’s heart. “Red Barchetta” tells the story of a future when Orwellian safety-obsessed governments have passed “motor laws” banning most forms of recreational driving. The song’s narrator/hero, however, has an uncle who owns a sports car – presumably a two-seat Ferrari “Barchetta” ...

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Getting loaded with the laypeople

"I think if the general public had a better idea of what actually goes on in getting their Oreos to the Kroger, they might just reconsider cutting that truck off in traffic."

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