Overdrive Extra

James Jaillet

More on required ELD connectivity options: What inspectors need at roadside

| January 08, 2016

omnitracsI wrote recently that in its final version of its electronic logging device mandate, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration nixed the requirement that the devices have data or web connectivity, as part of an effort by FMCSA to allow cheaper compliance options.

Compliant devices, per the rule, now must at minimum be equipped only with Bluetooth and a USB 2.0 port, meaning truckers won’t be strapped with paying for monthly subscription charges if they so choose.

The new cost of e-log compliance and FMCSA’s denial of small business exemption

The new cost of e-log compliance and FMCSA’s denial of small business exemption

Following a comment dust-up over the real costs of compliance of an ELD mandate, the agency relaxed certain portions of required device spec's in the ...

But, says Tom Cuthbertson of ELD provider Omnitracs, if operators opt for a device that uses solely local connections like USB and Bluetooth, the device must be equipped with both Bluetooth connectivity and a USB 2.0 port, not one or the other.

The same applies to carriers/drivers who choose a telematics-equipped device: They must be able to transfer data via both a wireless web service and via email.

The reason is, as Cuthbertson told Overdrive and as the rule denotes, drivers must be able to show during roadside inspections both their current 24-hour records and records from the previous 7 days, but it’s up to each state to determine how its enforcers will receive that information from truck operators.

ELD mandate pre-2000 exemption: Manufacture date or model year?

ELD mandate pre-2000 exemption: Manufacture date or model year?

The short answer is that FMCSA intends to draw the line according to model year, not date of manufacture. The long answer is that mixing ...

States will be required to receive data transfers via one local connection option and one telematics option, but they won’t be required to have the full suite of connectivity options, Cuthbertson said.

For instance, State A may decide its enforcers can receive data transfers via email and USB 2.0, meaning they won’t be able to receive data via wireless web service or Bluetooth connection.

State B, however, could outfit its enforcers with means for receiving transfers via email and Bluetooth. Or via wireless web transfer and USB 2.0.

In any instance, operators with compliant devices would be able to transfer their duty status records to an inspector, as compliant devices must offer both connectivity options in the category they choose — local or remote.

So, to the example above, if an owner-operator running a device that utilizes local connections hits State A and must transfer his records of duty status to an officer, he or she will make the transfer via USB 2.0.

When the same owner-operator hits State B, he’ll connect at roadside via a Bluetooth connection.

In both instances, however, safety officers dictate the transfer method, and compliant devices will allow for the transfer method they choose.

Further questions? Drop a note below and we’ll clarify.

E-log mandate set to take effect Dec. 2017, rule set for DOT publication

E-log mandate set to take effect Dec. 2017, rule set for DOT publication

The rule requires drivers currently required to keep paper logs to use ELDs, with a few exceptions. It also spells out hardware requirements for the ...

There are 12 comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *