Fatigue's Fast Track

Hours of service: Fatal flaws, a slow response to potential fixes

The fixed 14–hour on–duty clock virtually forces truckers to continue to operate when they feel tired and otherwise would opt for a long break. With fatigue monitoring tech on the rise, is there hope for change?

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Why driver fatigue-monitoring tech could spread quickly among fleets

While fatigue–monitoring technology holds the potential for a new approach to addressing hours of service, few observers anticipate federal action in that direction in the near future. The integration of such systems, though, appears to be well on its way, with no need for a government decree.

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Are driver monitoring systems destined to upend hours of service regulations?

Fatigue-monitoring technology promises to drastically narrow the often vast gap between the government’s formula for alertness and the reality of frequent fatigue. Such systems applied to individual drivers could theoretically replace the clock-based system that attempts to cover all drivers.

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Fatigue’s fast track — regulations: Are fatigue-monitoring systems destined to upend hours-based regulations?

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Fatigue’s Fast Track: How auto industry’s embrace of fatigue monitoring affects truckers

Unlike trucking, where fatigue-monitoring vendors are trying to sell their wares to fleets, in the automotive world it’s vehicle manufacturers who are the main drivers in adopting the technology.

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Fatigue’s Fast Track: How wearable tech detects driver fatigue without cameras

From Overdrive's in-depth look at fatigue management tech: Relatively new to trucking are wearable devices that detect fatigue without requiring camera input. Here's a look at some of the the leading camera-less monitoring systems.

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Fatigue’s Fast Track: Wearable monitoring devices competing with camera systems

From Overdrive's in-depth look at fatigue management tech: While adoption of wearable fatigue monitoring systems lags the adoption of camera systems, wearables are making headway as more fleets test the products. (See continuing coverage of this series Friday and Monday.)

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Fleets’ private eyes, platform No. 4: SmartDrive’s SmartIQ data analytics platform

From Overdrive's exploration of driver fatigue monitoring systems: Lytx' multi-camera system detects fatigue only insofar as signs of it are observed by event reviewers or can be extrapolated from on-highway interactions.

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Fleets’ private eyes, platform No. 3: Lytx’s ActiveVision add-on to the DriveCam service

From Overdrive's exploration of driver fatigue monitoring systems: Lytx is perhaps the biggest dual-camera-system purveyor, with its DriveCam system equipped in 400,000 trucks. Its new ActiveVision system adds machine-vision technology to the road-facing camera to detect lane departure, following distance and more.

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Fleets’ private eyes, platform No. 2: Netradyne’s Driver-i system

From Overdrive's special exploration of fatigue monitoring systems: A look at Netradyne's Driver-i system, which, in addition to a dual-view dashcam, is working on the ability to recognize signs of fatigue and distraction inside the cab.

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