6,800 trucking jobs added in April, unemployment rate tumbles

| May 02, 2014

The for-hire trucking industry added 6,800 payroll jobs in April on a seasonally adjusted basis, according to the monthly employment report released May 2 by the Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The U.S. economy as a whole added 288,00 non-farm jobs for the month, BLS reports. The national unemployment rate fell 0.4 percent to 6.3 percent in April. The decrease was the largest since September 2008 and unemployment is now at the lowest level in more than five years.

Economists attribute the surge to milder weather following a severe winter that had stifled the economy. Economists had predicted job gains to be about 210,000.

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March employment rose in construction (32,000 jobs), retail trade (34,500 jobs), professional and business services (75,000), education and health services (40,000) and leisure and hospitality (28,000).

Hiring in the government sector was up 15,000 jobs after being flat in March, while manufacturing gained 11,000, more than making up the 1,000 jobs lost the month before. Mining and logging jobs were down slightly, with 1,100 jobs lost in April.

Economists are divided on whether the March jobs number picked up pace after bad weather in January and February, or if hiring was still stalled by Mother Nature.

For-hire trucking totaled 1.4015 million payroll jobs in April, up 20,800 jobs (1.5 percent) from April 2013 and up 176,500 jobs (13.6 percent) from March 2010, the low point in the downturn. However, trucking employment remains 51,900 jobs (3.6 percent) below January 2007′s peak.

The BLS numbers for trucking reflect all payroll employment in for-hire trucking, but they don’t include trucking-related jobs in other industries, such as a truck driver for a private fleet. Nor do the numbers reflect the total amount of hiring since they only reflect the number of employees paid during a specified payroll period during the month.

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  • g

    Sure…jobs are available because everybody is Quitting. lol
    Who the heck wants to be a Puppet on a String? The original allure of trucking was Freedom from oppressive bosses and other Constraints…that is all gone today…..trucking is nothing but a Sentence today, a total Pain in the Ass……may as well stay HOME and be harassed and monitored…..with friends and family and ur own bed. Why leave Home to be Harassed???

  • localnet

    Who writes this nonsense? Unemployment tumbles? Tell that to the near one million that were kicked off the rolls and no longer counted this past month. If we keep this up we will be at full employment by summer. In other words, no one will be working, just kicking back on the beach with our EBT cards…

  • daddydrive1

    the job numbers are cooked, truth is that jobs are available if you don’t have any black marks on your record, or are a 14 day wonder. But under the new regulations even if you are not ticketed, you can and will be held accountable for something that is not your fault. Truth is that the new reporting systems are worse than the old, at least under the old system, dac, a person could despute what was being said against them. under the psp system now in place one can be blackballed, a practice which is illegal under federal law, with out proof of any offence happening. keeping good drivers off the road and making the roads less safe for motorists. truth is both the feds and companies want to get rid of experienced drivers and replace them with drivers who don’t know how the system should work, thus being able to force drivers to stay out extended amounts of time, only benefiting the company not the person. This is coming from a driver with over 30 years in the business, who owned his own company, sold out when things got bad, and now can’t find employment

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  • jan johnson

    You got that right!!!!!!! As long as they don’t count It’s that a boy so morons can pat themselfs on the back!!!! Oh look what we did its getting better NOT!