Fighting the Good Fight

| December 03, 2001


Health Care on the Go
Clinic near I-95 in Virginia caters to truckers

Although most truckers’ lives are consumed with time on the road, they can still work toward staying healthy and cancer-free.

One clinic near Richmond, Va., helps truckers do that. Located 1/4-mile off I-95, Air Park Medical and Occupational Health Services is within a few short miles of a truckstop and also offers truck parking for its customers.

“Over 90 percent of our business is truckers,” says Chrissy Brubaker, clinic director. “We do lots of D.O.T. physicals, and stress cancer prevention and teach self-exams.”

For a detailed list of clinics that offer cancer-related heath care in your area, contact the American Cancer Society at (800) ACS-2345.

Carlisle Campbell


Important Facts
All women should know the steps of early detection and risk factors of breast cancer

The American Cancer Society says preventive measures and early detection of breast cancer are important. The following are recommendations on early detection and risk factors to consider.

Examination information:

  • Women age 40 and older should have a mammogram screening each year.
  • Women ages 20 to 39 should have a clinical breast examination by a health professional every three years.
  • Women age 20 or older should perform a breast self-examination every month.
  • Look for changes in your breasts such as a lump or swelling, skin irritation or dimpling, nipple pain or retraction (turning inward), redness or scaliness of the nipple or breast skin, or a discharge other than breast milk.
  • Discuss any lumps with your health care professional. The doctor can determine whether additional tests are needed.

The following are risk factors in breast cancer:

  • Gender: Women have a 100 times greater risk of breast cancer than men.
  • Aging: About 77 percent of women with breast cancer are over 50 when diagnosed.
  • Genetic risk factors: Heredity accounts for 10 percent of breast cancer cases.
  • Family history: The risk is higher among women whose close blood relatives have breast cancer.
  • Personal history: A woman with breast cancer in one breast has a three- to fourfold-increased risk of developing a new cancer in the other breast.
  • Race: White women have a slightly higher risk than other races, and African-American women are more likely to die due to late diagnosis.
  • Early menstrual periods: Women who started menstruating before age 12.
  • Menopause: Women who went through menopause after age 50.

Other risks include:

  • Oral contraceptives
  • Estrogen replacement or hormone replacement therapy
  • Alcohol
  • Smoking
  • Obesity and high-fat diets

Fighting the Good Fight

| December 03, 2001

Health Care on the Go
Clinic near I-95 in Virginia caters to truckers

Although most truckers’ lives are consumed with time on the road, they can still work toward staying healthy and cancer-free.

One clinic near Richmond, Va., helps truckers do that. Located 1/4-mile off I-95, Air Park Medical and Occupational Health Services is within a few short miles of a truckstop and also offers truck parking for its customers.

“Over 90 percent of our business is truckers,” says Chrissy Brubaker, clinic director. “We do lots of D.O.T. physicals, and stress cancer prevention and teach self-exams.”

For a detailed list of clinics that offer cancer-related heath care in your area, contact the American Cancer Society at (800) ACS-2345.

Carlisle Campbell


Important Facts
All women should know the steps of early detection and risk factors of breast cancer

The American Cancer Society says preventive measures and early detection of breast cancer are important. The following are recommendations on early detection and risk factors to consider.

Examination information:

  • Women age 40 and older should have a mammogram screening each year.
  • Women ages 20 to 39 should have a clinical breast examination by a health professional every three years.
  • Women age 20 or older should perform a breast self-examination every month.
  • Look for changes in your breasts such as a lump or swelling, skin irritation or dimpling, nipple pain or retraction (turning inward), redness or scaliness of the nipple or breast skin, or a discharge other than breast milk.
  • Discuss any lumps with your health care professional. The doctor can determine whether additional tests are needed.

The following are risk factors in breast cancer:

  • Gender: Women have a 100 times greater risk of breast cancer than men.
  • Aging: About 77 percent of women with breast cancer are over 50 when diagnosed.
  • Genetic risk factors: Heredity accounts for 10 percent of breast cancer cases.
  • Family history: The risk is higher among women whose close blood relatives have breast cancer.
  • Personal history: A woman with breast cancer in one breast has a three- to fourfold-increased risk of developing a new cancer in the other breast.
  • Race: White women have a slightly higher risk than other races, and African-American women are more likely to die due to late diagnosis.
  • Early menstrual periods: Women who started menstruating before age 12.
  • Menopause: Women who went through menopause after age 50.

Other risks include:

  • Oral contraceptives
  • Estrogen replacement or hormone replacement therapy
  • Alcohol
  • Smoking
  • Obesity and high-fat diets

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