FMCSA unveils driver training rule proposal, sets up core curriculum and more for pre-CDL drivers

| March 04, 2016

driver training conesThe Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration is set to publish Monday, March 7, a proposed rule that, if made final, would implement a required core training curriculum for prospective truckers before they receive their CDL. The curriculum notably includes at least 30 hours of behind-the-wheel training before being issued a CDL.

The Entry Level Driver Training rule’s implementation would take place three years after its final publication in the Federal Register, which will come after the agency takes public comment for 60 days on the proposal and makes any changes to the rule based on that feedback. The proposal then would have to be approved by the DOT and the White House’s Office of Management and Budget before being published. The three-year countdown to its implementation would begin then. 

The proposal, unveiled Friday, March 4, by FMCSA, in addition to the core curriculum and behind-the-wheel requirements, seeks to establish a registry of FMCSA-approved driver training providers. FMCSA’s rule outlines minimum qualifications related to instructors, testing, training vehicles and more that the agency will use to approve training providers for the registry.

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The agency is accepting public comment on the rule for 60 days, starting Monday. Visit regulations.gov then and serach for docket number FMCSA-2007–27748 to see the rule and to file a comment.

The rule will apply to all drivers required to complete a CDL skills test to obtain a CDL and to those upgrading their license from Class B to Class A.

The curriculum for those seeking a Class A license is broken down into two categories: Theory and actual driving time.

The theoretical component includes required training on basic vehicle instruments and controls, basic operation of a vehicle, how to perform a vehicle inspection, controlling a vehicle under various road and traffic conditions, how to shift and back a vehicle, hours of service, handling cargo, crash procedures, fatigue awareness, vehicle maintenance and violations, trip planning and more.

The driving time component of the rule requires operators to spend at least 30 hours behind the wheel before receiving a CDL, with at least 10 of those hours spent on a driving range. How the other 20 hours are received will be determined by the training providers, but the rule does stipulate that drivers must drive at least 10 of them on a public road or take 10 public road trips of no less than 50 minutes each.

Overdrive will have more on the rule and its requirements in the coming weeks.

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31 comments
greyhound bus
greyhound bus

Schneider National training was like if you mess up you get corrected and you try again.

rollin wit 9's
rollin wit 9's

Listen to feedback. Joke of the day right there.

David Jesse
David Jesse

You have a 14 hour , you have time for a 3 hour nap,you can spilt your logs ,you can even do reverse splits ,how are going to to train a driver living in Florida to go down cabbage , the schools job is to give you the basics , our companies fail to implement the next steps , his is a driver going to get payed going thru all this training ? Why are all we scared of driving in traffic , you could get stuck at midnight in Chicago , use. Your expirence to go around the traffic , lookin austin ,you have a raceway around Austin where you could do triple digits

jOE sCHMOE
jOE sCHMOE

The driver puppy mills attempt 15 day CDL courses. Days 1-5 are study and the written exam. 6-15 are 5 driver students + 1 instructor, about 90 minutes at the wheel each day. This rule will double school driving time, so the mega fleets will have to drop pay to 18¢ per mile.

rollin wit 9's
rollin wit 9's

PTL has been at. 18 for teams. Those boys working for free. Dont be afraid put those company names out there so people don't waste their time

Jd
Jd

My dad helped me to drive a truck and I have helped my sons to drive a truck are those days gone my dad has passed away. When is fmcsa going to see when cars & trucks drive on the road some have to go faster, make a turn, to get to a destination there can be a fender bender we are human.!!!!! Get off our back

Cameron
Cameron

10 hours spent on a driving pad? Once again this is clearly another rule written to benefit big business over small, it is clearly intended to push more drivers through the puppy mills(England, Swift and the like). So much for a father or uncle teaching their son or daughter the right way to drive over time.

Jim Downard
Jim Downard

I watched my dad drive semi when I was growing up. I was taught to shut up, watch and learn. I started driving our semi hualing heavy equipment when I was 16. The way he taught me, at least when hauling heavy equipment, is in his words, "those chains don't hold the load on the trailer, the driver does". I'm accident and ticket free now for 33 years. In one of the comments here I've read, it's pretty much a common sense thing, and most today don't have any.

bigred
bigred

LOL>>The Dot report that roadside inspections saved 472 lives in 2012 had me rolling in the bunk. The only ones getting inspected are the OLD Timers that aren`t paying them off with that prepass...As for the Training, LOL< yep 30 hours will get them all the time they need for this job.

Thomas Duncan
Thomas Duncan

Trucking has a lot more to do with being responsable and common sense more than anything else.Trouble right now is everyone learns to back up and they think they are truckers.

Tomahawk
Tomahawk

Or the Mills tell them they are.

Hellocomein
Hellocomein

Go Donald Trump 10-4 good buddy's! !!!

John Etling
John Etling

30 hours spent behind the wheel before receiving a CDL... Yeah, that is enough... ~dripping with sarcasm~ You got to be kidding me! That's not enough to give the full experience of what driving a truck is like. More like 300 hours would be more realistic in my opinion.

b
b

300 HRS hell might as well be a lawyer!!! for FMCSA.

Lee E Tibbetts
Lee E Tibbetts

The school I went to in 1985 was 305 hrs. The school teaches the basics. It is up to companies to finish the training. I think drivers trained by family members are more than likely better trained. The problem is CDL mills. And why does it take 3 years to implement? If this rule is so important why not 90 to 180 days for schools to be certified and training? This rule is moot, if they keep allowing exemptions for companies like C R England to get around the rules. A well trained professional driving force is what the industry needs if we are ever going to receive proper compensation, not warm steering wheel holders.

lance
lance

Lance, I agree with Rascal you are seeing considerably more crashes, you can put all the safety equipment you want on these trucks still comes down to the driver. the colossal wrecks in the snow storms are from two things not paying attention and speed which relates to the 14 hour rule these drivers are racing to get a parking spot because they want to get there ten hour break in as soon as possible. I have driven for 27 years it gets worse and worse every year, the government doesn't even follow the rules they have set up all the immigrants driving who cannot speak English or refuse to why don't we take a long look at that and see who is having a lot of the wrecks and causing the problems. Lets make this a skilled industry like the electricians and the plumbers have annual training and refresher classes. Yu pay for good people you will get good people.

Coffeeclue
Coffeeclue

Yes, so many problems with immigrants who don't speak English... [Sarcasm]. Spending all day alone in a truck, one definitely needs great speaking skills. Most road signs are international and only have comments for Americans who don't understand, for example, that a big rectangle means "Do Not Enter." You will never see such comments in Europe nor anywhere else. People there just know how to read road signs. On the other hand, it's so funny reading some of the comments posted by natively born "'muricans." No regards for spelling or punctuation. Hearing them speak is even funnier.

Bob
Bob

What the hell is wrong. Isn't mr. Darling going to tell us how many lives this is going to save. Isn't that why we have an Obama appointed lawyer in charge of the FMCSA That couldn't even teach the class. !! WHAT !! it is going to take 3 YEARS to get started training these Robots, How many people will this kill before the Robots get on the highway. Is this how they are going to replace all the drivers leaving because of ELD's and other regulations. Is the FMCSA going to set the cost of these driving schools. Who is going to pay for one of these drivers when he can flip burgers for more than drivers make per hour. This is what happens when Government lawyer are going to run the trucking industry. Think about it Have a nice day.

Pachy Dermetitus
Pachy Dermetitus

Maybe they should put a minimum 6 months with a mentor who has at least 3 years driving experience. based on the survey above the FMCSA rule does nothing to bottleneck robo-recruiting.

b
b

That sounds good. I can see SWIFT starting that program tomorrow and with a pay increase.

LFS Trucking
LFS Trucking

Curious to know how this is going to affect a dad teaching his son or daughter how to drive. I've been taking one or two guys a year and teaching them. I feel that I can train a person way better than any truck driving school.

b
b

If you can't speak or read our language you can get a green card and drive on that

Samuel Coyne
Samuel Coyne

I'm curious about that as well. I learned from my dad, actually let me drive in and out of the woods when I was 9 years old. When I turned 18, I didn't go to truck driving school, just took the written:skills/road tests and passed everything first try. Went with a trainer for two days with the company I'm with now and been on my own ever since. I get compliments all the time how professional and skilled I am, even been told that I have "old school" values that are hard to find these days.

Rascal
Rascal

If you want to eliminate fatigue, do away with the 14 hour bullshit and make it possible for drivers to take naps when fatigued instead of penalizing them for doing so. Allow for split breaks like we used to have. I'm telling you people, these crazy hours of service are the blame, along with inexperience, for the horrific truck crashes we see each and every day. When I started 40 years ago, a truck wreck was an oddity. Maybe saw one every couple of weeks or so. Now it is an oddity to go 200 miles without seeing a truck wrecked all to hell. Another factor is, and this is major, is the lack of speed enforcement on 4-wheelers. Damn idiots drive 20 or 30 miles over the speed limit and what the hell do you think is going to happen when someone hiccups?

rollin wit 9's
rollin wit 9's

I try to keep a cool head but i can't say I'm not going to purposely put some djck head into the forest one day. Sign on the trailer reads 'you cut me off or slam on your brakes in front of me, you might not live to see tomorrow ' And that's from the heart!

Coffeeclue
Coffeeclue

Neither kidding nor blind. Driving fro Minneapolis to East Coast weekly. They're just people. Not 4 wheelers. Drive defensively, maintain safe distance and you'll be OK. There will always be assholes. Always were. Driver's job is to keep cool head, not to get caught up in road rage.

Coffeeclue
Coffeeclue

Where do you drive? The only time I see major truck crashes is during bad snow storms. I really don't see that many speeding 4 wheelers either. You sound like Donald Trump.