Like Father, Like Son

| November 01, 2001

The songs “Convoy” and “Teddy Bear” were on the records Eric’s father gave him. These were some of Earl’s favorite songs because they were about his life. Although Eric isn’t a truck driver, he thinks his life is similar to his father’s. He even interviews with the media while traveling down the highway.

“I’m a gypsy of sorts because I’ve always been interested in traveling and long for the road,” he says. “I’m on a bus now near Fort Worth, on my way to Billy Bob’s for a show, and then it’ll be on to somewhere else.”

He’ll have a new album out this fall that he hopes will be as successful as his first one. One song on the album, “Road-King Daddy,” he wrote with his drummer Richard Carpenter, a former trucker; and Carpenter’s wife, Debbie, who works for a trucking company in Nashville.

He recited a verse from the song: “I’m a road-king daddy, a freight haulin’ caddy, big wheels turnin’, diesel burnin’, I’m a smoke stackin’, mud flappin’, ain’t too shabby, When I’m trailer truckin’, I’m a road-king daddy.”

Eric says the song complements the trucking lifestyle. “It’s about the truckers,” Eric says of the song. “It’s about their lives.”

Eric’s father worked the graveyard shift. He’d come home tired but still mowed the lawn and did other tasks around the house. “His work ethic was instilled in me, and it’s helped me in my career,” Eric says.

He also wrote a trucking song, “The Call,” for country music singer John Anderson. Trucking has been part of the country music artist’s life, and it shows in his career. He appreciates truckers and says it’s not because he leads a similar lifestyle.

“I realize, and wish others would, that when you walk into a Wal-Mart or other store, the merchandise got there because a trucker brought it there,” he says. “I think people take this for granted. Some guy drove all night with bloodshot eyes and with hands welded to the steering wheel to get the merchandise there on time. I appreciate that.”

Like Father, Like Son

| November 01, 2001

The songs “Convoy” and “Teddy Bear” were on the records Eric’s father gave him. These were some of Earl’s favorite songs because they were about his life. Although Eric isn’t a truck driver, he thinks his life is similar to his father’s. He even interviews with the media while traveling down the highway.

“I’m a gypsy of sorts because I’ve always been interested in traveling and long for the road,” he says. “I’m on a bus now near Fort Worth, on my way to Billy Bob’s for a show, and then it’ll be on to somewhere else.”

He’ll have a new album out this fall that he hopes will be as successful as his first one. One song on the album, “Road-King Daddy,” he wrote with his drummer Richard Carpenter, a former trucker; and Carpenter’s wife, Debbie, who works for a trucking company in Nashville.

He recited a verse from the song: “I’m a road-king daddy, a freight haulin’ caddy, big wheels turnin’, diesel burnin’, I’m a smoke stackin’, mud flappin’, ain’t too shabby, When I’m trailer truckin’, I’m a road-king daddy.”

Eric says the song complements the trucking lifestyle. “It’s about the truckers,” Eric says of the song. “It’s about their lives.”

Eric’s father worked the graveyard shift. He’d come home tired but still mowed the lawn and did other tasks around the house. “His work ethic was instilled in me, and it’s helped me in my career,” Eric says.

He also wrote a trucking song, “The Call,” for country music singer John Anderson. Trucking has been part of the country music artist’s life, and it shows in his career. He appreciates truckers and says it’s not because he leads a similar lifestyle.

“I realize, and wish others would, that when you walk into a Wal-Mart or other store, the merchandise got there because a trucker brought it there,” he says. “I think people take this for granted. Some guy drove all night with bloodshot eyes and with hands welded to the steering wheel to get the merchandise there on time. I appreciate that.”

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