Channel 19

Todd Dills

Plum phone deal for Verizon customers

| July 30, 2013
The Droid Razr M is currently on a free-with-two-year-contract deal with Verizon -- it's a solid phone.
The Droid Razr M is currently on a free-with-two-year-contract deal with Verizon — it’s a solid phone, this shot showing the Kevlar backing.

If you’re a Verizon customer with a fair amount of history with the company, you may well be part of the cellular carrier’s phone-upgrade program, offering deals on prices as incentive to upgrade hardware — I’d resisted participating in the program until My old phone, a three-year-old Motorola Droid Pro, got to the point where I was waiting up to a minute for the phone to load a contact to send a message to. (No idea what the phone’s issues were exactly, but suffice it to say that I’d had enough.

When I jumped on the upgrade bandwagon for certain was when I noticed Motorola’s Droid Razr M smartphone — an iPhone-size phone with processing power of the Samsung Galaxy models and very comparable speed and performance all around — was and still is right at this moment available free of charge with a two-year contract commitment, if you’re in need of a new phone. It’s a great unit — the only downside I’ve seen so far is an inability to make the 32-gigabyte MicroSD card I have (I like to carry around a great deal of  my music library with me) the default storage venue for apps/media like music and pictures,  but I may just be missing something — I downloaded the file-manager app Astro File Manager, which makes moving music/pictures between the phone’s storage and the card easy enough, and it’s not that big of deal in the end.

The phone’s 8 gigabytes of native storage, even after a fair amount of home video shooting with my daughter this past weekend and all the many apps I’m using residing on the phone, is only about half full at this point.

(If you’re storing a big music library on a MicroSD in an Android phone currently and you do upgrade, moving the card seamlessly between phones shouldn’t be much of an issue — it wasn’t for me at least between two Motorola phones, running differing version of the Android OS.)

Compared to what I’m used to, battery life, too, is very good, even on the road and getting extensive use — my trip to the Expedite Expo in Wilmington, Ohio, from Nashville this past weekend put me well out of primary network range several times and put a strain on the device with on-the-road use of apps for mapping, email, talk, music and more. I charged the phone just once during the two-night trip.

Here’s some more about the Razr M, a [VERY LENGTHY] video iPhone/Razr M comparison below if you’ve got some time (and, oh yeah, Overdrive‘s Trucker Tools app works great on it):



  • Todd Dills

    Meanwhile, for those of you looking for the newest thing: I’ve heard the the Motorola/Google Moto X (to be manufactured in Texas, making it the first such smartphone to be made in the U.S.) may be released as early as tomorrow. Here’s a little of what’s known today about it: http://www.theverge.com/2013/7/10/4508938/moto-x-and-the-droids-of-the-future-what-we-know-so-far

  • shojobakunyu

    We signed up for our Verizon Service through Best Buy and there is a $10.00 a month Trade Out Policy. 8 months after I got my phone, my corded handsfree devices stopped working so I took it back to Best Buy and they said “OK, no worries!”, popped out the battery, put it in an envelope, gave me a replacement phone, and less than a week later I picked up my new/referb LG Luicd. They said that it doesn’t matter what happens, I just bring the phone back and they’ll swap it out. No questions asked. We got the LG Lucid Phones for like, $1.00 each with the new customer deal and knowing that they could be $600.00 each to replace, $10.00 a month didn’t seem like that bad a price. When we had US Cellular, they had $10.00/month protection plan, too, but that was for the non-smart phones AND they still charged you for a portion of the replacement price AND they didn’t cover all possible reasons a phone might fail, so it ended up costing MORE than the phone was worth by the end of your contract… But this protection plan has already saved me a LOT of not just money but aggravation because while I had to use a lower end smartphone as a temp, it was only for about 3 or 4 days before I got my new phone and was right back up and running. We’ll stick with Verizon for a while, but we’ll be doing our contracting via Best Buy from now on. (Especially since they can price different plans, so if we want to dump Verizon when the contract is up, we don’t have to go store-to-store to do it.)