Retreads: Modern money savers?

| July 10, 2013
Continental's ContiTread
Continental’s ContiTread

Do you utilize retreaded tires in your operation? If not, you could stand to save money doing so, says an in-depth look at the issue on Overdrive sister site CCJ.

The stories are tailored to a fleet audience, but Jack Roberts’ “Back from the Dead: Using retreads to maximize profitability” articles do offer some insight into the tricky issue of using retreads that can help owner-operators and small fleet owners, too.

For fleets — and potentially owner-operators — not using retreads in a tire program is basically flushing money down a drain, say fleet managers and tire makers quoted in Roberts’ articles, which also say that the hesitancy surrounding using retreads is mostly ungrounded, as 75 percent of blown tire parts along highways come from new tires.

Click here to see the first part of Roberts’ series, which details the benefits of using retreads and how to start using them. Click here to see the second part, which covers how retread investment can pay off in the long run.

  • Mind Games

    Heck that’s all I can afford is used tires and I’m lucky if I can find a regroove or two!

  • Greg Newman

    Michelin is making retreads now. They make one specially designed for spread axle trailers. I actually ordered 4 of them today and I’m going to run them on the front axle of my spread. That’s where they will get the most abuse. If it goes well. I’ll buy more. We’ll see how it goes.

  • Recap User

    You will like that XZE SA. I have them at all positions on my spread and they hold up very well. You will de pleasantly Surprised.

  • retread advocate

    I’ve experienced time & again ; longer tread wear,with retreads,than with virgin rubber & it wasn’t always economy or off brands either !

  • Old Hand

    Have been using retreads for years as a heavy hauler. I have had great luck with Bandag caps. I buy a quality tire, cap it once then sell the casing. I average 20% longer tread life with caps than virgin tires.

  • Old Hand

    Have been using retreads for years as a heavy hauler. I have had great luck with Bandag caps. I buy a quality tire, cap it once then sell the casing. I average 20% longer tread life with caps than virgin tires.

  • Old Hand

    Have been using retreads for years as a heavy hauler. I have had great luck with Bandag caps. I buy a quality tire, cap it once then sell the casing. I average 20% longer tread life with caps than virgin tires.

  • http://twitter.com/cjmarley Skater Girl

    I think it probably depends on where you get it from. One got put on the truck just in March. Then I was out of work for a month due to a broken hand. Got back on the road last week…retread that replaced the old one came apart. So that tire got about a month of use out of it.

  • Jon

    I put on a set of 4 used virgin tires to replace 4 of my 8 used recaps.

    My mileage went UP .3-.4 MPG. That’s $300-400+ per month in fuel savings alone. Over $3000 Annually. How are recaps going to compete with that over a 2 year span?

  • Rolandas Zulca

    All blown tires I had was retreads.Was using it on trailers.On Goodyear retreads you can see crack where it was molded on after a year on the road.Michelin holds better but blows more often.I’m getting 2.5-3 years from virgins(140K mi/y average).Will put it only on truck-had good luck with Michelin retreads.

  • No Reform

    I have NEVER had a New tire give me trouble..but RECAPS are a Nightmare..in the dessert when Temps reach 100 and above..all bets are off..the CAP peels off or the Sidewall Explodes on the Old Casing..especially under a heavier load..as SPEED increases also..the risk of tire failure on RECAPS increases…My choice is to Never SEE another recap…from Kingman to Barstow and Palm Springs to New Lordsburg…in the SUMMER you see blown apart RECAPS littered on the shoulder the entire way. Winter Time…not NEARLY as many ALLIGATORS….I would say MOST of these Blown apart tires and the Blown out Sidewalls are NOT caused by NEW TIRES.

  • Ronald Quint

    I just dont trust recaps. I have a hard time trying to find the casing original build dates, very important, and the retread build dates. The sidewalls cracking due to heat and sun exposure make them suspect in my book. And at a certain point, can get you a ticket or oos violation from law emforcement. As a fleet manager of 65 trucks, i have better success with original tires.

  • g22p

    Every 8 or 10 years ,Somebody cums up with some new process for recapping . When I give it a try it turns out to be junk. For me ,Caps have always been the most expensive tires I every had .Bandag, Goodyear, Michelin,they are all bad. They are going to cost you in fuel,down time when they start peeling 30-60-90 days after you get them.Get a good set of tires Goodyear, Michelin, etc.and if you keep air in them ,take care of them they will last you 300 thousand plus.The cheapest tires in the long run are the best tires you can buy. P.S. Don’t buy anything made in China.!

  • Freightliner01

    G’Pa taught me, ” nothing that’s good is cheap and nothing that’s cheap is good !” The physical damage to tractor/trailer ( lights, flaps, wiring etc. ) when a recap goes offsets any POP savings.

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