Traffic cost trucking industry nearly $50B in 2014, ATRI says

| April 20, 2016

highway-traffic-jam-on-bridgeTraffic congestion cost the trucking industry an extra $49.6 billion in operating costs in 2014, according to data released this week by the American Transportation Research Institute.

The analysis of the data by ATRI revealed congestion cost an average of $26,625 per truck per 150,000 miles.

ATRI found congestion caused delays totaling more than 738 million hours of lost productivity, which equates to 264,500 truck drivers sitting idle for an entire working year.

Top 10 most congested freight intersections

ATRI's annual rankings this year gave the dubious distinction of most congested freight chokepoint to the city of Atlanta and its "Spaghetti Junction" north stack ...

Additionally, the research revealed that urban areas accounted for most of the delays as 88 percent of the congestion costs were concentrated on only 18 percent of the network mileage, and 95 percent of the total congestion cost occurred in metropolitan areas.

“Unfortunately we’ve come to expect traffic congestion as a part of our daily lives, but ATRI’s latest analysis illustrates what a significant productivity drain that congestion is on our industry and the economy at large,” said David Congdon, Chief Executive Officer of Old Dominion Freight Line.

4 comments
David P. Wisla
David P. Wisla

Bob, you don't know how right you are. Once you get lawyers involved it's for no other reason than money. The tort bar in this country loves this stuff. Every little reg. gives them one more nail to put into somebody's coffin fulfilling their role; the never ending search for money. You know the drill and how they get paid and how they get ahead at their firms, no secret. Ridiculous numbers like these are just a symptom of a much larger disease. Like any other disease of this nature it needs to be removed. In this case I think a transplant is called for. We remove the diseased tissue and replace it with clear cut, common sense, well thought out and rigorously tested methods for moving our freight faster and safer than ever before. (Dare I say lean?) I have also called for not only a meaningful "learning period" with continuous mandatory training throughout a driver's career, but also the pay and perks of being a professional. I'm sorry, there's so much more but I've been singing the same song for years. Let's just leave it here for today. Thanks Bob.  

bob walker
bob walker

@David P. Wisla You have some good ideas but no we don't  need a transplant. There are thousands of different trucking operations and the best will last and the rest will not. We don't need more guide lines or rules, the bad one will fail the good ones will work . The government doesn't need to run the business   . The only CONTROL the government needs is highway laws like the ones for the rest of the public. We don't need a bunch of new rules that work for some and make a mess for others. That is the problem, that is why it worked for fifty plus years. When you set rules for shippers, receivers or drivers you can't change one without effecting the rest. Let the drivers drive there trucks SAFELY the way that works best and SAFE for all of us. You can't write HOS rules that work in New York city and work the same crossing Montana. So just quit trying. Let this be a free country, some will do good and some will fail. Try this it will work!!! 
 

FL Fred
FL Fred

To Bob walker, I couldn't have said it better myself...yeah, I second that-what he said!!!!!

bob walker
bob walker

Why don't you tell what every trucker knows!! It is not the traffic that cost the trucking industry $49 billion it was the FMCSA with these HOS rules. The rules that won't let a driver park and take a nap in the afternoon when traffic is bad and than drive  late at night when there is no traffic. The FMCSA screwed up the way it was done for fifty years now don't try and blame it on traffic .  Put it on the front porch of that bunch of damn lawyers who told you this was going to make everybody safe on the highways. When you want to pay drivers by the mile and than force them to drive when you can't make 3 miles per hour what the hell do you think is going to happen. This is what happens when you let people set the rules that know nothing about the trucking industry at all. Why don't you just man up when you screwed up and think of how you can drop the rules that screwed it up. Have fun in traffic.