Truckers — and enforcers — still grappling with basics of CSA, study shows

| January 29, 2014

Driver screening -- KY inspection station photoEven though the Compliance, Safety, Accountability program turned three years old in December, truck drivers and even enforcers still don’t know what they should about the program and how it works, according to a study released this week by the American Transportation Research Institute. 

Related

Crashes and interventions: CSA’s crash flaw

Independent owner-operators have the lowest rate of truck-involved crashes but are far more likely to be put out of service than drivers for carriers with 500 or more trucks, which have a higher crash rate.

Drivers averaged 42 percent on a knowledge test about CSA, while enforcers fared only a little better, scoring 67 percent. 

ATRI’s report, dubbed Compliance, Safety, Accountability: Assessing the New Safety Measurement System and Its Implications — 2013 Update, studied 7,800 drivers during CSA’s first three years, and the low test scores show “drivers do not have a clear understanding of CSA,” the study concludes. 

Of those 7,8000 drivers surveyed, just 1.5 percent of them said CSA had been “very effective” in helping improve safety, while 20.5 percent said CSA had been “very ineffective” in improving safety. 

About 20 percent of drivers supported FMCSA and enforcement using CSA to measure a driver’s safety, and 53.1 percent oppose FMCSA and enforcers using CSA.

Related

Infographic: Owner-operators inspected four times more often than largest fleets

An infographic on Overdrive sister site CCJ shows some of the more disparate data that favors fleets over independents.

ATRI partnered with the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance to produce the results for enforcers, 20 percent of whom, according to the survey, thought incorrectly that federal safety regulations changed under CSA. 

The study showed that 20 percent of enforcers surveyed said they lacked training on DataQ’s, 23 percent said they lacked training on roadside inspection standards and 27 percent for roadside inspection violations. 

The study is available here, and the CSA knowledge test is included, with an answer key.

  • Robert

    Lets face it there are far to many who want to control trucking and through there efforts they continue to create program after program most of which hinder trucking and transportation across the US.

  • norman ott

    Enforcement does not want trucks running after 10 pm or before 5 am. As long as groups like moms against tired truckers are running the show it can only get worse. When all of the old timers are out of trucking they will have their way. New drivers won’t know how it was and will accept any rule that comes their way. Thank God I started when trucking was enjoyable and people were friendly

  • Jason Haggard

    Less than 70% of the trained enforcement officials know the rules, that is a failed system, there is not other way to interpret it.

  • Jason Haggard

    To be fair the survey also shows that drivers didn’t bother to study the program or were not properly educated by their carrier.

  • William McKelvie

    Well are you FINALLY starting to wake up, this is how this system was designed. Do you remember Ferro and her license system snafu in MD? I do. Same thing here, nobody understands it, nobody comprehends the points scales or charges, nobody can translate it, shall I keep going. Another clog in the pipeline brought to you by Ferro. Now can everyone PLEASE stop kissing her patoochie? Thanks. Cause I really gotta tell you, doing that makes you look repulsive, honestly.