George & Wendy Show

Wendy Parker

Perils of the multiple stop load: One, three, four, two

Let’s talk about multiple stop loads in a dry van, shall we?

Has it ever happened, in the history of all trucking history, that a multiple stop load has actually been loaded correctly in the box? If it has, it’s a unicorn, and I hope you got a picture of it, because Ripley’s will be calling for it.


Hunting Bigfoot in 2014

Wendy Parker interviews Bigfoot field researcher Aaron Bergeron, who says he's received more than one Bigfoot sighting report from a driver over the years.

George doesn’t usually take multiple stops, for this very reason. This one is totally on me, because I talked him into it. The money was right and it was cross-country and up into the Pacific Northwest, where I have a much higher chance of a Bigfoot sighting. Also, I hadn’t been all the way across in a while and I needed to see my peeps on the West Coast. The added bonus that it was pre-loaded , which is usually a plus, made it a sure thing in my book. Once again, I have learned a valuable lesson in my quest to dispatch us painlessly.

“What’s our loading appointment time?”

“That’s the surprise – it’s pre-loaded!”

“You booked a multiple stop that’s pre-loaded?”

“Yes! Aren’t you happy? We don’t have to wait to be loaded! Yay!”

The look on his face was not one of happiness and joy.

“No I am not happy. This is going to be a cluster.”

“I don’t understand. You usually like drop and hooks.”

“I like a drop and hook – this isn’t a drop and hook, it’s a multiple stop load. Someone who could care less if the deliveries are in the box in the correct order loaded this trailer, and I’ll bet anything it’s not loaded right.”

“It could be. It could happen.”

“It has never happened to me. If you ever take another one, you make damn sure I’m going to be on that dock with the paperwork and stop itinerary to direct the loading of the box. You know what, just don’t ever even look at another multiple stop. There’s a reason the money is better, but it’s not enough to make up for the bullshit involved.”

“I have a feeling this one is right. Really. I’m sorry, I thought I was doing something awesome for you.”

“You don’t book anything based on a feeling, babe. Ever. Screw it, it’s booked. Let’s go see how bad it is.”

“It’s going to be fine. I just know it.”


The ups and downs (mostly the former) of self-dispatch

"So tomorrow we set out, for parts unknown, on a self-dispatch journey that doesn't include a regular run...."

Two days later we’re sitting at the first stop and find out the first delivery was loaded into the box first, which means it’s behind four other loads. Yay. He’s not mad at all about having to unload and re-load the whole damn thing. Fortunately, he’s as good at loading the truck as he is at driving it, and we are at a receiver who is cool enough to let him use their equipment to do it himself. This self-dispatch thing is fraught with danger, and if I ever learn all the little ins and outs, I might not get smothered with a pillow while I sleep.

Sometimes, lessons are hard to learn. Sorry, babe.