Interesting Industry Tidbits

In the new video game Big Mutha Truckers, players compete as one of Ma’s four children, hauling cargo.

MAKE MA PROUD OF YOU

Will Ma Jackson give you the family trucking business? That depends on how well you “buy, sell, and swindle your way to a fortune,” according to publicity for the new video game Big Mutha Truckers. Players compete as one of Ma’s four children, “each possessing his or her own personality, driving style and attributes.” The winner is the one who makes the most money hauling cargo and wheeling and dealing – not to mention dodging troopers, discovering back roads and avoiding cargo thieves. The game is available for major video game platforms and PCs.


PRISONER IN HIS OWN CAB

John Taylor was afraid his unexpected visitors had a sting operation in mind. It started when he parked at a fuel stop at 9 p.m., reports Great Britain’s This is Exeter website. When bees swarmed around his cab, the captive 59-year-old Taylor buzzed police and pest experts on his cell phone. They advised him that such behavior was common for the European honeybee, and that he should stay put.

At 7:30 a.m., the bees suddenly flew off. “Spending so long trapped in my cab was not pleasant,” Taylor told the news website, “but it was better than risking being stung.”


“VN” STANDS FOR “VERY NEWLYWED”

Since her fleet-owner parents own more than 20 Volvos, Jenny Martens had an understandable bias when it came to choosing the ultimate limo for her wedding to Chris Hartfelder. With help from Burr Truck and Trailer Sales, in Vestal, N.Y., and Volvo Trucks North America, the newlyweds enjoyed riding in a white VN 780 – and drawing more than a few second glances from pedestrians and motorists in downtown Syracuse.


MORE DISTRACTING THAN A CELL PHONE

“It’s hard to believe, but in fact no law was broken with the intercourse on the motorway.”

– A German court spokesman, in a Reuters report, discussing the hit-and-run conviction of a man who, while having sex with a hitchhiker on his lap, drove into a road sign and fled the scene


LIGHT UP A CAMEL

People are dying in a growing number of nighttime crashes in Israel’s Negev desert. The answer: phosphorescent safety strips.
The strips are applied not to cars or trucks, but to the camels causing the crashes, reports Associated Press.

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