Reservation resident confesses to beating trucker

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Stormy Adakai has been arrested after confessing to the attack on truck driver Amos Phillips at a truck stop at Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho.Stormy Adakai has been arrested after confessing to the attack on truck driver Amos Phillips at a truck stop at Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho.

Trucker Amos Phillips, bludgeoned with a rock while parked at an Idaho truck stop, says the FBI has arrested a Fort Hall Reservation resident who has confessed to the attack.

Phillips was told by FBI that Stormy Adakai, 23, a Native American, was arrested Nov. 8. Fort Hall is home to the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, who operate the TP Truck Stop on I-15 just north of Pocatello.

The tribes’ Sho-Ban News page on Facebook also reported Adakai’s arrest and confession. The FBI referred all inquiries to the Fort Hall Police and Public Affairs Office, whose representatives could not be reached for comment.

“I’m relieved that at least he’s off the streets and can’t do it to someone else,” Phillips said.

Phillips was beaten with a rock by a man who broke into his truck at the TP Truck Stop, demanding money, around 2:30 a.m. Sept. 3. In addition to receiving facial cuts and broken bones, Phillips sustained a blood clot on his brain that later resulted in seizures.

Because of the seizures and the medication he takes to control them, Phillips, 64, believes it’s doubtful he’ll return to professional driving. He would have to be free of the medication and seizures for five years to be able to do so.

Adakai, “with blood on his face and clothes” on the morning of the attack, “told a witness that he assaulted a truck driver with a rock,” reported the tribes’ Sho-Ban News, quoting a press release from the Tribal Public Affairs office.

Amos Phillips received head wounds and a brain injury after a man broke into his truck, demanded money and beat him.Amos Phillips received head wounds and a brain injury after a man broke into his truck, demanded money and beat him.

Phillips said he’s been told the case will go before the tribal court and also will be subject to federal prosecution.

If he were to drive professionally again and need to park overnight around Fort Hall, Phillips said, he would be willing to park at TP again.

“But I guarantee you one thing: I would be loaded for bear,” he said, adding that Fort Hall Police told him Idaho law allows carrying a concealed weapon without a permit.

Phillips, who has no health insurance, says he has applied for Idaho’s victim aid program, which would help pay for his medical bills. A crowd-funding campaign started by his employer, John Williams, had raised $5,715 from 57 donors as of this morning.

Also, the tribes are holding a raffle today and Saturday to help raise funds for his medical expenses, Phillips said.

Williams has said lawyers are checking into a potential claim on the truck stop’s insurance that also would help with medical bills.

Williams owns JWE Inc., a five-truck fleet based in Camdenton, Mo., which is also where Phillips lives.

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