After the accident: Coping, personal perspective, first-responder heroics and practical guidance

user-gravatar
Updated Jul 26, 2021

Pictured above with the SoundCloud player embed of today’s Overdrive Radio podcast (and below) are Harry Pierce and his dog, Blue, whose story you’ll hear through the voice of Pierce’s widow, Monica. She spoke as part of the Trucking Solutions Group’s Accident Awareness conference call a week and a half ago, which the TSG was kind enough to allow us to rebroadcast in its entirety.

Blue is back home and doing well thanks to local police in Kansas. Monica has dealt with the loss of her husband (53) in a variety of ways, leaning on family and friends as well as her husband’s community of trucking colleagues.Blue is back home and doing well thanks to local police in Kansas. Monica has dealt with the loss of her husband (53) in a variety of ways, leaning on family and friends as well as her husband’s community of trucking colleagues.

It’s all well worth the listen as a reminder of priorities out there — no load is more important than the lives driving it.

I also spoke further with TSG members and owner-operators Vince Crisanti and Shane Rizzuto about their own involvement in past serious accidents, and the many years of fallout, personally. While Overdrive has fairly recently covered some of the legal particulars on post-accident procedures in our Trucking Law series, the TSG call was less narrowly focused, touching on an array of areas, from just what to do in the event of an accident — whether you’re the first or last to come upon an emergency on the highway – to how to cope personally if you’re involved in one yourself and help others through similar events.

Among the other voices, featured here are three first responders – firefighter Derek Olsen of Lafayette, Colorado; a water-rescue volunteer based in New York named Jim; and a state trooper named Chad. Owner-operator Rizzuto’s past volunteer-firefighter experience also informs the discussion. Take a listen:

I’d encourage anyone out there who knows someone who’s been through an injury or fatality crash to well keep in mind what Crisanti had to say, wrapping up the call: “If you know anyone who’s been involved in an accident and who needs help long after the lights are gone, encourage them to reach out to a friend. Anyone who’s ever lifted weights knows that heavy lifting needs a spotter. It’s not a sign of weakness to ask for help, it can be a sign of great strength because you’re handling more weight than most people.”

Showcase your workhorse
Add a photo of your rig to our Reader Rigs collection to share it with your peers and the world. Tell us the story behind the truck and your business to help build its story.
Submit Your Rig
Reader Rig Submission